Programme Specification for the 2019/0 academic year

BSc (Hons) Geography and Geology with Professional Placement

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBSc (Hons) Geography and Geology with Professional Placement Programme codeUFS4GOACSMCC
Study mode(s)Level 1
Academic year2019/0
Campus(es)Cornwall Campus
NQF Level of the Final Award6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

At our Penryn Campus in Cornwall we offer a welcoming and supportive atmosphere, where you are encouraged to make the most of Cornwall’s unique environment, both in your studies and in your free time. Our Geography and Geology programme benefits from this context in treating Cornwall as a ‘natural laboratory’, taking learning into the field to explore the incredible diversity of rocks, environments, Earth system processes and natural landscapes in the region.

If you choose to study Geography and Geology in Cornwall you will be taught by expert, internationally research-active staff from the Centre for Geography and Environmental Science (CGES), and from Camborne School of Mines (CSM), who together cover a wide range of physical geography and geology specialisms, including Earth system science, petrology, stratigraphy, palaeontology, sedimentology, environmental sustainability and history, climate change, remote sensing, landscape change and hydrogeology. Teaching and research activities emphasise the value of interdisciplinary thinking, and you develop your knowledge in a supportive learning environment with small class sizes and an informal, friendly ambiance.

Our programmes are designed to give you the knowledge and skills you need to compete in today’s graduate job market. You will have access to the latest technologies and the opportunity to carry out a work placement. Field work forms a key component of this degree programme, and you will go on regular one-day field trips within Cornwall as well as residential field trips further afield.

On the work placement, you will gain valuable experience by spending a year working within an organisation appropriate to your degree. You will apply for positions with relevant organisations, with the support of the module convenor. You are encouraged to consider a range of organisations, including consultancies, charities, NGOs, research institutes and universities. The Centre for Geography, Environment and Society (CGES) has established collaborations with local, national and international organisations that you can consider when applying for placement positions. You will gain valuable experience from the professional placement: you will learn to apply the skills learnt during the first and second years, improve personal and transferable skills, make new contacts and enhance employability. Professional placements allow you to develop your career focus and are extremely valued by employers.

When participating in field courses, you will be required to cover any visa costs and, if necessary, purchase anti-malarial medication and relevant immunisations. You will also need to provide your own specialist personal equipment appropriate to the field course destination, e.g. walking boots, rucksack, mosquito net, sleeping bag, binoculars. You may incur additional costs dependent upon the specific demands of the research project chosen. Details of specialist equipment, vaccinations and visas that you must supply at your own expense are provided at http://vle.exeter.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6569.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

The BSc (Hons) Geography and Geology programme aims to provide you with knowledge and understanding of the internal and external processes that have controlled Earth’s evolution, including climate change. The programme explores the physical processes shaping the Earth’s surface over different temporal and spatial scales and how these relate to the solid Earth. Field and laboratory work are key elements of the programme, intended to equip you with the key skills required to compete as a professional geoscientist and as basis for further progression to a higher degree (MSc). In addition, the programme aims to develop your personal and key skills in verbal and written communication, data analysis, manipulation and interpretation, numerical problem solving, personal time management, team work and group interaction. As you progress through the programme you will have the opportunity develop your own interests in the discipline and gain a more detailed and nuanced appreciation of a variety of specific aspects of physical geography and geology in which staff in CGES and CSM specialise. The programme is underpinned by research-led teaching, starting in year 2 but forming the core of the modules delivered in the final year.

We use a combination of traditional teaching methods such as exams and essays, coupled with innovative teaching and learning methods which together create a stimulating and effective learning environment. Similarly, our assessment ranges from more conventional examinations and essays to writing research proposals, practical reports and field guides. We have standard assessment criteria for coursework essays, exams, oral presentations, posters, dissertations, field notebooks and learning diaries.

The year spent on professional placement aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the applications of Geography and Geology in the workplace and encourage you to think critically, evaluate evidence, analyse, challenge, solve problems, work collaboratively, and communicate effectively.

4. Programme Structure

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

http://geography.exeter.ac.uk/currentstudents/

http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/emps/studentinfo/subjects/geologycsm/modules/

You may take optional modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

You may take elective modules up to 15 credits outside of the programme in the first stage and up to 30 credits outside of the programme in the second and final stages of the programme as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module.

If you have mobility or health disabilities that prevent you from undertaking intensive fieldwork, reasonable adjustments and/or alternative assessment can be considered. This could include replacing a fieldwork module with an alternative in agreement with the Director of Education.

You are also permitted to take the five-credit module LES3910 Professional Development Experience in any year. Registration on this module is subject to a competitive application process. If taken, this module will not count towards progression or award calculation.

Stage 1


105 credits of compulsory modules, 15 credits of optional modules.

a This compulsory module involves a series of one-day fieldtrips in Term 2 on Fridays and a residential fieldtrip during a week in early May. These will have to be taken into account by timetabling for both Year 2 and over the exam period.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CSM1031 Earth and Environmental Chemistry 15No
CSM1036 Field Geology and Geological Maps [See note a above]30No
CSM1042 Dynamic Planet 15No
CSM1044 Earth History and Palaeontology 15No
GEO1405B Earth System Science 15No
GEO1414 Geography Tutorials 15No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
GeoP S1 BSc G&G - Geography opt 2019-0
GEO1406B Analysis of Environmental Data 15 No
GEO1506B West Penwith Fieldclass 15 No
GEO1408B Global Issues in Environmental Science 15 No
GeoP S1 BSc G&G - Geology opt 2019-0
CSM1045 Surveying and Digital Mapping 15 No

Stage 2


30 credits of compulsory Geography modules, 30 credits of compulsory Geology modules, 60 credits of optional modules (including at least 30 credits of Geography modules and 15 credits of Geology modules).

b The field course module, GEO2447, is compulsory. If you are unable to take the field course, you will be required to select another optional 15-credit module.

c This module includes the Dorset Field Course.

d You must takeĀ CSM1041 Quantitative Methods for GeoScientists if you plan to take CSM3152 Hydrogeology in the final stage.

e You may not take GEO2449 and LES2002 in the same academic year.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CSM2183 Sedimentology 30No
GEO2447 Isles of Scilly Field Course [See note b above]15No
GEO2448 Research Methods in Geography, Environment and Society 15No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
GeoP S2 BSc G&G - Geography opt 2019-0
GEO2428B Atmosphere and Ocean Systems 15 No
GEO2441 Remote Sensing for Environmental Management 15 No
GEO2451 Ice Sheets: Glaciology, Climate and the Oceans 15 No
GEO2444 Landscape Evolution 15 No
GEO2440 Geographical Information Science and Systems 15 No
GEO2450 Biogeography 15 No
GeoP S2 BSc G&G - Geology opt 2019-0 [See note d above]
CSM2182 Structural Geology and Tectonics 30 No
CSM1041 Quantitative Methods for GeoScientists 15 No
GeoP Employability opt [See note e above]
GEO2449 Green Consultants 15 No
GEO2453 Social Innovation Consultants 15 No
LES2002 Workplace Learning 15 No

Stage 3


120 credits of compulsory modules.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
LES3002 Professional Placement 120Yes

Stage 4


45 credits of compulsory modules, 75 credits of optional modules.

e You may not take GEO2449 and LES2002 in the same academic year.

f GEO3460 Dissertation in Geography-Geology is a 40-credit GEO-coded module but you may select a supervisor from either CLES or CEMPS (i.e. in Geography or Geology).

  • If your Dissertation is taken in Geography, you must take at least 15 optional credits at level 6 in Geography and 30 optional credits at level 6 in Geology to qualify for the award in order to maintain credit balance between the two subject areas across all three years of the programme.
  • If your Dissertation is taken in Geology you must take at least 45 optional credits at level 6 in Geography to qualify for the award in order to maintain credit balance between the two subject areas across all three years of the programme.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
GEO3460 Dissertation in Geography-Geology [See note f above]40Yes
LES3001 Preparing to Graduate 5No

Optional Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
GeoP SF BSc G&G - Geography opt 2019-0
GEO3455 Marine Climate and Environmental Change 15 No
GEO3448 Quaternary Environmental Change 15 No
GEO3443 USA Field Course 30 No
GEO3454 Antarctica: Science from a Frozen Continent 15 No
GEO3461 Arctic Frontiers: Can We Preserve the Arctic Environment? 15 No
GeoP SF BSc G&G - Geology opt 2019-0
CSM3060 Dynamic Climates of the Past 15 No
CSM3049 Contaminated Land Management and Remediation 15 No
CSM3152 Hydrogeology 15 No
CSM3061 Energy Resource Geology 15 No
GeoP Employability opt [See note e above]
GEO2449 Green Consultants 15 No
GEO2453 Social Innovation Consultants 15 No
LES2002 Workplace Learning 15 No

6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Recognise the structure and composition of the solid Earth (e.g. Core, mantle, crust), the hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere and the processes operating within and between them.
2. Understand the cycling of matter and flows of energy into, between and within these Earth system components.
3. Apply present and past interactions between Earth system components and the effects on them of extra-terrestrial influences.
4. Recognise the contribution of chemistry, mathematics, physics and biology to our understanding of Earth structure, materials, processes and landscapes.
5. Understand sustainability and social awareness in an Earth science context (e.g. Renewable vs. Non-renewable resources, climate change, biodiversity).
6. Recognise major geoscience paradigms (uniformitarianism, evolution of life as revealed in the fossil record, plate tectonics).
7. Appreciate geological time, principles of stratigraphy and the stratigraphic column, dating techniques, rates of Earth processes and major events in Earth history, nomenclature and identification of fossils.
8. Appreciate spatial scales, study of structures, materials and processes ranging from atoms to planets.
9. Understand terminology, classification and identification of minerals and rocks.
10. Understand terminology, nomenclature and identification of geological structures.
11. Collect and document geoscience information in the field, production and interpretation of geological maps and manipulation of Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
12. Undertake surveying and measurement in field and laboratory contexts, using qualitative, quantitative and instrumental techniques.
13. Understand geological aspects of human impacts on the environment.
14. Understand geohazards and their impacts on human societies.
15. Recognise the need for a multi-disciplinary approach in advancing understanding of Earth systems, contribution of physical geography and geology to development of knowledge of our world.
16. Understand applicability of earth sciences to the work environment.
17. Develop awareness of prior research and data sources.

Material is introduced by lectures and directed reading / research and you are given very clear guidance in how to manage your learning. Understanding is developed and consolidated by laboratory work, private study exercises and, in particular, by field classes. Work is carried out individually and in groups with tutorial support and is both self-assessed and tutor marked to provide feedback.

Field work and project work is used extensively to integrate material and make knowledge functional.

Direct assessment is through a range of formal written examinations, both open and closed book and marked coursework in the form of essays, problem sheets, presentations, laboratory reports and reports based on directed reading/research.

Field work-based modules are a major component of the overall programme assessment; their summative assessment is based on field notebooks, field slips, geological maps and associated reports. Dissertations are assessed through a combination of mid-term presentation and formal assessment of final reports and presentations. Formative feedback is offered during all field trips during discussions with staff in the field.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

18. Recognise and use subject-specific theories, paradigms and concepts.
19. Critically analyse, synthesise and summarise information, including prior research.
20. Collect and integrate lines of evidence to formulate/test hypotheses.
21. Apply knowledge and understanding to address problems.
22. Recognise the moral/ethical issues of investigations and appreciate the need for professional codes of conduct.
23. Plan, conduct and report on investigations.
24. Collect, record and analyse data using appropriate field and laboratory techniques.
25. Work in a safe and responsible manner in field and laboratory.
26. Reference work in an appropriate manner.

18-21 are integrated into most modules and developed steadily throughout the first, second and final years; in particular, 19-21 are developed during second and final year field work and dissertation modules.

22 is developed by use in modules throughout the programme.

23-25 are introduced in a number of first year modules, developed further in many second and final year modules, where extensive field data collection and laboratory work is undertaken. 23-25 are an integral part of the field work and dissertation modules in the final year.

26 is developed throughout the three years of the programme and is taught explicitly in stage 1.

Problem-solving, analytical and synthesis skills are assessed within many modules through a range of formal written examinations, both open and closed book, and marked coursework. These skills are primarily shown, however, in dissertation and field work modules in the second and final stages, (assessed via written report and field documents, verbal presentation). Practical skills are assessed in part through laboratory reports and logbooks throughout the first and second years, but mainly through the field work modules in all years and the dissertation, where they are used extensively.

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

27. Receive and respond to a variety of information styles (written, verbal and graphic) and communicate in these styles to different audiences, including use of the Internet.
28. Appreciate issues of sample selection and data quality in the collection and use of environmental and geoscientific data.
29. Manipulate, interpret and present data using appropriate techniques and packages.
30. Solve numerical problems using computer and non-computer based techniques.
31. Work in a team, identifying and recognising individual and collective opinions and roles and evaluating performance of all members.
32. Develop self-managed and lifelong learning skills (target setting, time and project management, reflective practice).

27 and 29 are specifically introduced throughout the programme with regular verbal and written presentations of work.

28 is explicitly covered in almost all second and final year modules.

29-30 are introduced in key first and second year modules, further developed in all the second year modules, most of the final year modules.

31 is developed through laboratory and group work in many modules, especially those involving field courses.

32 is initially developed in the first year with you being required to carry out regular reviews of you own progress, upon which you get formal feedback through tutorials. Further development occurs throughout the programme, particularly in the final year Dissertation.

Assessment of key skills occurs throughout the entire programme, mostly through items of coursework in the form of written and oral presentations, field notebooks and maps, and project reports.

27-30 are implicitly assessed in all modules and explicitly assessed in many modules across all years.

31 is implicitly assessed in group work throughout the programme and explicitly in the second year field course module.

32 is implicit in much of your study but is explicitly tested in first year tutorials.

7. Programme Regulations

Programme-specific Progression Rules

To progress to Stage 2 you must normally achieve an average mark of at least 60% in Stage 1. If you do not achieve an average mark of 60% in Stage 1, you will be interviewed to determine whether you can continue on the Professional Placement programme; if you do not succeed in that interview you will be required to transfer to the three-year programme. This is to ensure that only those students who are likely to succeed in their professional placement are selected. If you are unsuccessful in your application for a professional placement, you will be transferred to the three year programme.

LES3002 Professional Placement counts as a single 120-credit module and is not condonable; you must pass this module to graduate with the degree title of BA or BSc Geography and Geology with Professional Placement. If you fail the professional placement your degree title will be commuted to BA or BSc Geography and Geology.

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for all taught programmes can be found in the TQA Manual, specifically in the Credit and Qualifications Framework, and the Assessment, Progression and Awarding: Taught Programmes Handbook. Additional information, including Generic Marking Criteria, can be found in the Learning and Teaching Support Handbook.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

You will be located jointly in the Centre for Geography and Environmental Science, and Camborne School of Mines, on the Penryn Campus. You will receive formative feedback after seminars, in-lecture exercises and other formal learning experiences. Project supervisors provide academic and tutorial support once you move on to the research components of the programme. In addition, the Programme Director will offer every student a meeting each term with an academic who provides guidance and feedback on assessment performance. Your progress will be monitored and you can receive up-to-date records of the assessment, achievements and progress at any stage.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Please refer to the University Academic Policy and Standards guidelines regarding support for students and studentsĀ’ learning.

10. Admissions Criteria

Undergraduate applicants must satisfy the Undergraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Postgraduate applicants must satisfy the Postgraduate Admissions Policy of the University of Exeter.

Specific requirements required to enrol on this programme are available at the respective Undergraduate or Postgraduate Study Site webpages.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

(http://as.exeter.ac.uk/support/admin/staff/qualityassuranceandmonitoring/tqamanual/fullcontents/)

12. Indicators of Quality and Standards

The programme is not subject to accreditation and/ or review by professional and statutory regulatory bodies (PSRBs).

13. Methods for Evaluating and Improving Quality and Standards

The University and its constituent Colleges review the quality and standard of teaching and learning in all taught programmes against a range of criteria through the procedures outlined in the Teaching Quality Assurance (TQA) Manual Quality Review Framework.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

College of Life and Environmental Sciences (CLES)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences (CEMPS)

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

Not applicable to this programme.

18. Final Award

BSc (Hons) Geography and Geology with Professional Placement

19. UCAS Code

F861

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits ECTS credits

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

Level 1

23. Dates

Origin Date

12/03/2019

Date of last revision

12/06/2019