University experts feature in prestigious ranking of world’s most influential scientists

Leading climate, environment and health academics from the University of Exeter have been recognised as being amongst the world’s most influential researchers, according to a prestigious new ranking.

Satellites are key to monitoring ocean carbon

Satellites now play a key role in monitoring carbon levels in the oceans, but we are only just beginning to understand their full potential.

Exeter scientist up for award alongside Greta Thunberg

An Exeter scientist has been nominated for a climate communication award – alongside environmental activist Greta Thunberg.

Climate change could drive British crop farming north and west

Unchecked climate change could drive Britain’s crop growing north and west, leaving the east and south east unable to support crop growing, new research suggests

Widespread drying of European peatlands in recent centuries

Many of Europe’s peatlands are currently the driest they have been in the last 1,000 years, new research shows.

Bean tree plan to protect Amazon

Amazon deforestation could be slowed by planting bean trees that would keep soils fertile and help smallholders make a living.

Bid to reconstruct richness of prehistoric oceans

Scientists are reconstructing the world’s “pristine” prehistoric oceans.

‘Great West’ can lead world in tackling climate change

The ‘Great West’ can lead the world in efforts to tackle climate change.

New international project will investigate hidden costs of floods communities

The University of Exeter will lead an international project to investigate the hidden impact of adaptation measures designed to protect flood-prone communities worldwide.

Devon's Net-Zero Task Force hits the ground running at its first meeting

The first step in Devon’s journey towards carbon neutrality was taken today when Devon’s Net-Zero Task Force met for the first time.

Food proves to be the magic ingredient in changing Cornish lives

New research from the University of Exeter shows that the Food for Change programme, which uses growing, cooking and trading activities to inspire change, is making a huge difference to people’s lives across Cornwall.

Scientists strengthen cooperation, U.K. now shares responsibility with Norway for developing ocean greenhouse gas measurements

The U.K. will join hosting the Ocean Thematic Centre within ICOS, a European research infrastructure measuring greenhouse gases on the atmosphere, land and oceans. Long-term measurement of the seas is important since the oceans take up about one quarter of the carbon dioxide humans release to the atmosphere, reducing the rate of climate change.

Impact of climate change on global banana yields revealed

Climate change could negatively impact banana cultivation in some of the world’s most important producing and exporting countries, a study has revealed.

Rainforests can only absorb CO2 as long as nutrient stores last

How much carbon dioxide can tropical rainforests absorb?

Gulf between UK fracking industry and public opinion laid bare as less than 1 in 10 people say regulation of shale gas extraction is too strict

A major new public attitudes survey on fracking shows people have low trust in the energy companies involved and want decisions taken at a local level.

Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires, study shows

The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown.

Explore nature’s mysterious hidden worlds

Delve into the hidden world of microorganisms, discover the strange creatures that lurk in the deep ocean and the frozen continent, and be amazed by secretive glowing animals at this year’s Science in the Square.

Plate tectonics may have driven “Cambrian Explosion”, study shows

The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist.

Universities have alerted us to the scale of the climate crisis – now they must lead in showing society how to solve it

Calum Harvey-Scholes, research associate in Energy Policy at the University of Exeter, writes for the Conversation UK

Armed conflict risks could be heightened by future climate impacts, study shows

Climate change could heighten the risk of future outbreaks of armed conflict and civil war, a study has said.

Exeter climate scientist appointed MBE

A leading climate scientist has been appointed MBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

Rapid retreat of Arctic coastline revealed in images from the air

Extreme erosion of Arctic coastlines in a changing climate – up to a metre a day – has been revealed with drone surveys.

Fishing among worst jobs for health

People working in the fishing industry have among the poorest health of all workers in England and Wales, new research suggests.

Climate emergency debated at University of Exeter

Hundreds of people gathered to discuss climate and environmental issues at the University of Exeter last night.

Why my fears about climate change made me cross the line that separates academia from activism

James Dyke, Senior Lecturer in Global Systems at the University of Exeter, writes for the Conversation UK 

Call for evidence on climate change extended

The Committee on Climate Change has extended the deadline on a call for evidence to identify relevant published information about the risks and opportunities facing the UK from climate change.

Are winter wildfires actually due to climate change?

Professor Richard Betts, Chair in Climate Impacts at the University of Exeter and Head of Climate Impacts Research at the Met Office Hadley Centre, writes for the Conversation UK

Natural resources valued differently by men and women, study shows

Men and women value, access and use resources from the natural environment in distinct and different ways, a new study has shown.

Faster CO₂ rise expected in 2019

With emissions already at a record high, the build-up of carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere could be larger than last year due to a slower removal by natural carbon sinks.

Small trees are among the oldest in Congolese rainforest

Forest giants have long been considered the oldest trees in tropical forests, but new research shows small trees can also be very old, and can even grow older than the big ones.

Local focus could help tackle global problems

People’s love for their local areas could be harnessed to tackle global environmental problems, researchers say.

Experts tackle Mars settlement problems

Ugly interior design, interplanetary “jetlag” and personality clashes are among the problems hampering humanity’s efforts to settle on Mars, experts say.

What if global warming passes 1.5°C?

What will happen if humanity fails to limit global warming to 1.5°C?

Exeter research ranked among the most influential of 2018

Research conducted by Exeter experts has been recognised amongst the top 100 influential in 2018.

Turning climate change from a ‘tragedy of the commons’ to positive action

Climate change must no longer be viewed as a “tragedy of the commons”, researchers say.

Asylum hearing help from new video

People seeking asylum will be helped to prepare for appeal hearings by a new video created by experts from the University of Exeter and Asylum Aid.

New explainer videos for Antarctic climate change game

A popular game which demonstrates the impact of climate change in Antarctica now has an exciting new feature – explainer videos, narrated by the penguin characters from the game.

University of Exeter team pioneers virtual field trips in 3D

3D gaming technology is being used by a team from the University of Exeter to take students and researchers on virtual field trips to the Arctic Circle.

Free movement can protect humans from environmental threats

Greater freedom of movement and investments in human rights and social opportunities can help protect humans from environmental threats like rising sea levels, new research says.

Public must help shape ‘smart cities’

The public must play a key role in the ongoing “smart cities” revolution, researchers say.

Asian hornets: First UK use of radio tags to find nest

Electronic radio tags have been used for the first time on the UK mainland to help find a nest of invasive Asian hornets, which was then destroyed.

Why reformed A levels are not preparing undergraduates for university study

Matt Finn, Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Exeter, writes for the Conversation UK

Jeremy Corbyn was once a high-profile opponent of nuclear power – what happened?

Bridget Woodman, Senior Lecturer and Deputy Director of Energy Policy Group at the University of Exeter, writes for the Conversation UK

 

 

Warmer springs can reduce summer plant productivity

Warmer springs are leading to substantially reduced plant productivity across the Northern hemisphere in the later months of the year, a new study has revealed.

Famous theory of the living Earth upgraded to ‘Gaia 2.0’

A time-honoured theory into why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve over billions of years has been given a new, innovative twist.

Peatlands will store more carbon as planet warms

Global warming will cause peatlands to absorb more carbon – but the effect will weaken as warming increases, new research suggests.

Drought increases CO2 concentration in the air

The concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere rises faster during drier years because struggling ecosystems absorb less carbon, new research shows.

Scientists unravel history of lost harbour of Pisa

New insights into the evolution and eventual disappearance of Portus Pisanus, the lost harbour of Pisa, have been revealed.

The bright ways forests affect their environment

Why do forests emit the gases that give pine forests their distinctive smell? Scientists think they've found out.

Forests crucial for limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees

Trying to tackle climate change by replacing forests with crops for bioenergy power stations could increase the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere.

Beavers arrive in the Forest of Dean

A pair of Eurasian Beavers will return to the Forest of Dean today (24 July) for the first time for about 400 years.

Scientists propose solution to ‘Gaia puzzle’

Scientists may have solved a puzzle over why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve.

New Exeter institute to tackle ‘global challenges’

How can our planet and its people flourish as the human population reaches an estimated 9-11 billion?

Climate predictions should include impacts of CO2 on life

Climate change predictions are not taking account of the full range of possible effects of rising carbon dioxide

Major new project to understand public attitudes and community responses to shale gas in the UK

A new research project led by academics at Exeter, Stirling and Cardiff universities will shed light on how public responses to shale gas unfold over time at national, regional and local levels.

Coral reefs losing ability to keep pace with sea-level rise

Many coral reefs will be unable to keep growing fast enough to keep up with rising sea levels, new research suggests.

Professor wins environment award

Professor Richard Brazier has won the Pride of Devon Environment award for his work

Invisible barrier on ocean surface can reduce carbon uptake

An invisible layer of biological compounds on the sea surface reduces the rate at which carbon dioxide gas moves between the atmosphere and the oceans, scientists have reported. 

Beavers do dam good work cleaning water, research reveals

Beavers could help clean up polluted rivers and stem the loss of valuable soils from farms, new research shows.

Temperature swings to hit poor countries hardest

Temperature fluctuations that are amplified by climate change will hit the world’s poorest countries hardest, new research suggests.

Exeter expert part of international team investigating massive Antarctic glacier collapse

A University of Exeter academic is part of an international team of experts working to discover how quickly a massive Antarctic glacier could collapse.

Microclimates may provide wildlife with respite from climate change

Sheltered pockets of cooler and more variable conditions in the British countryside may help native species

Climate change could raise food insecurity risk

Weather extremes caused by climate change could raise the risk of food shortages in many countries, new research suggests.

Met Office Visit Day

Sixty Five Geography students from Streatham and Penryn campuses recently travelled to the Met Office headquarters in Exeter for an immersion day.

Oxygen loss could be a huge issue for oceans

A major study into an ancient climate change event that affected a significant percentage of Earth’s oceans has brought into sharp focus a lesser-known villain in global warming: oxygen depletion. 

Exeter University Geography host a Mapathon to celebrate GIS day

Exeter Geography teams up with British Red Cross to host a Mapathon at University of Exeter, helping to put vulnerable regions on the map.

Coral Reefs are in trouble - how can people adapt?

An international team of scientists has developed a strategy to boost people’s ability to adapt to climate change, revealed in a new study published in Nature Climate Change.