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Energy Policy Group

Books and Chapters

Chapter: Shale gas in the United Kingdom and Europe

Joseph Dutton
in Bakshi, V. (ed.) Shale Gas: A Practitioners Guide to Shale Gas and Other Unconventional Resources

With shale gas continuing to have a dominant impact on North American natural gas markets, unconventional natural gas now appears to be causing change in the global supply mix. The extent of this change requires the examination of a unique set of challenges that extend far beyond North America. Complex environmental, social and technical issues must be navigated for the development of safe and sustainable hydraulic fracturing practices to unlock the full potential of this unconventional resource, and the second edition of this guide examines the issues around hydraulic fracturing in a practical and user-friendly manner.

This fully revised edition features contributions from leading authorities in the field. Chapters cover key issues such as: the regulation of hydraulic fracturing in the US, and the UK; worldwide natural gas pricing trends; joint ventures; gas sale agreements; unconventional gas in Australia; and the causes of action and potential outcomes in shale gas disputes. Together, the contributions give a crucial insight into one of the fastest-moving areas of the natural gas industry.

'Shale Gas' is an essential reference tool for natural gas producers, lawyers (both in private practice and in-house), energy industry advisers and end users worldwide, providing a practical and timely overview of the shale gas industry.

Published June 2017 | Globe Law and Business

Chapter: Le politique energetique de Rouyame Uni: orientations passes et future

Joseph Dutton
in Hazouard, S & Lassere, R. (eds.) La Transition Energetique. Un defi franco-allemand et europeen 

As the implementation of the climate objectives established at the COP21 at the end of 2015 in Paris begins, the following are compiled in one volume: the contributions of two study days and a colloquium on energy and climate issues in France, Germany And in Europe. 

This book first proposes to put the current French and German energy transition strategies in the context of the policies carried out in recent decades. The analysis then turns to significant examples of Franco-German cooperation at various decision-making levels, before focusing on the structural changes in the electricity market. A fifth part is devoted to environmental issues, including the impact of COP21 for Europe

Published June 2017 | CIRAC

Chapter: Defining and projecting EU energy policy

Caroline Kuzemko
in Godzimirski, J.M. (ed.) EU Leadership in Energy and Environmental Governance

This edited collection focuses on the impact of the changing global distribution of power on the EU's energy policy and ability to project its approach to energy-related issues abroad. It maps the EU's changing position on global energy, the impact of various factors on its energy policy, and its relations with Russia, China, the USA and Brazil.

Published March 2016 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: The Great British Energy Transition?

Caroline Kuzemko
in Looney, R. (ed.) Handbook of Transitions to Energy and Climate Security’

An original contribution to our understanding of a phenomenon that is reshaping the world, this title thoroughly discusses the transformation of the energy security policy arena brought on by two dramatic developments – the increased potential availability of energy in many parts of the world on the supply side, and on the demand side increasing concerns over the harmful effects on the environment brought on by the use of fossil fuels. An in depth discussion specifically focuses on what energy security means to different countries, and examines which of those countries appear to be managing their energy/climate transitions successfully and which are having a more difficult time adapting to the new environment.

  • Part 1 introduces the topic, covering the main themes and provides an overview of the chapters
  • Part 2 provides a framework for policy evaluation, considering the evolving factors affecting energy security and the energy/climate policy trilemma
  • Parts 3 to 6 discuss energy transitions in the carbon producing countries (Saudi Arabia, Canada, Iran, Russia, Mexico), in intermediate carbon/producing/consuming countries (China, United States, UK, Brazil, Argentina, South Africa), in carbon consuming countries (Germany, Japan, South Korea, Israel, India, Spain) and finally in carbon reduction countries (France, Denmark, Switzerland)
  • Part 7 looks at attempts at regional/international cooperation
  • Part 8 considers the prospects for the future, examining technological breakthroughs.

This title builds on the theme of unfolding energy transformations driven by, but increasingly constrained by climate/environmental considerations. It is ideal for researchers and students in the areas of environmental politics and policy, climate change, and energy and climate security, as well as for academics and professionals.

Published March 2016 | Routledge

 

Chapter: Electricity markets and their regulatory systems for a sustainable future

Catherine Mitchell
in P. Ekins, M. Bradshaw & J. Watson (eds.) Global Energy: Issues, Potentials, and Policy Implications

Energy, and access to energy, are essential to human life, civilisation and development. A number of energy issues – including energy security, energy prices and the polluting emissions for energy use – now have high prominence on global agendas of policy and diplomacy. In addressing these and other global energy issues, the purpose of this book is to lay out the broad global energy landscape, exploring how these issues might develop in coming decades, and the implications of such developments for energy policy. There are great uncertainties, which will be identified, in respect of some of these issues, but many of the defining characteristics of the landscape are clear, and the energy policies of all countries will need to be broadly consistent with these if they are to be feasible and achieve their objectives. The book therefore provides information about and analysis of energy and related resources, and the technologies that have been and are being developed to exploit them that is essential to understanding how the global energy system is developing, and how it might develop in the future. But its main focus is the critical economic, social, political and cultural issues that will determine how energy systems will develop and which technologies are deployed, why, by whom, and who will benefit from them. The book has three Parts. Part I sets out the current global context for energy system developments, outlining the essential trends of global energy supply and demand, and atmospheric emissions, from the past and going forward, and their driving forces. Part II explores the options and choices, covering both energy demand and energy supply, facing national and international policymakers as they confront the challenges of the global context outlined in Part I. Part III of the book brings together the discussion in Parts I and II with consideration of possible global energy and environmental futures, and of the energy policy choices which will determine which future actually comes to pass

Published September 2015 | Oxford University Press

Chapter: Politicising UK energy: What ‘speaking energy security’ can do

Caroline Kuzemko
in M. Flinders & M. Wood (eds.) Tracing the Political: Depoliticisation, Governance and the State

Over the past two decades politicians have delegated many political decisions to expert agencies or ‘quangos’, and portrayed the associated issues, like monetary or drug policy, as technocratic or managerial. At the same time an increasing number of important political decisions are being removed from democratic public debate altogether, leading many commentators to argue that they are part of a ‘crisis of democracy’, marking the ‘end of politics’. Tracing the political uses a broad range of international case studies to chart the politicising and depoliticising dynamics that shape debates about the future of governance and the liberal democratic state. The book is part of the New perspectives in policy and politics series, and will be an important text for students of politics and policy, as well as researchers and policy makers.

Published September 2015 | Policy Press

Chapter: How and why do Policy Paradigms Change; and does it matter? The Case of UK Energy Policy

Florian Kern, Caroline Kuzemko & Catherine Mitchell
in J. Hogan & M. Howlett (eds.) Policy Paradigms in Theory and Practice: Discourses, Ideas and Anomalies in Public Policy Dynamics

The contributors investigate policy paradigms and their capacity to explain the policy process – actors, ideas, discourses and strategies employed – to provide readers with a better understanding of public policy and its dynamics. Drawing together leading researchers in the field, this edited collection offers a unique insight into a selection of policy paradigms, investigating their significance for public policy, policy making and policy change, in both theory and practice. The contributions open up new avenues of research on policy dynamics while re-evaluating the accuracy and effectiveness of existing policy orthodoxy.

Published July 2015 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: The Political Dynamics of Green Transformations: Feedback Effects and Institutional Context

Matthew Lockwood
in I. Scoones, M. Leach & P. Newell (eds.) The Politics of Green Transformations

Multiple ‘green transformations’ are required if humanity is to live sustainably on planet Earth. Recalling past transformations, this book examines what makes the current challenge different, and especially urgent. It examines how green transformations must take place in the context of the particular moments of capitalist development, and in relation to particular alliances. The role of the state is emphasised, both in terms of the type of incentives required to make green transformations politically feasible and the way states must take a developmental role in financing innovation and technology for green transformations. The book also highlights the role of citizens, as innovators, entrepreneurs, green consumers and members of social movements. Green transformations must be both ‘top-down’, involving elite alliances between states and business, but also ‘bottom up’, pushed by grassroots innovators and entrepreneurs, and part of wider mobilisations among civil society. The chapters in the book draw on international examples to emphasise how contexts matter in shaping pathways to sustainability

Written by experts in the field, this book will be of great interest to researchers and students in environmental studies, international relations, political science, development studies, geography and anthropology, as well as policymakers and practitioners concerned with sustainability.

Published January 2015 | Routledge

Book: The Global Challenge of Encouraging Sustainable Living — Opportunities, Barriers, Policy and Practice

Edited by Shane Fudge, M. Peters, S.M. Hoffman & W. Wehrmeyer

This unique book illustrates that in order to address the growing urgency of issues around environmental and resource limits, it is clear that we need to develop effective policies to promote durable changes in behaviour and transform how we view, and consume, goods and services. It suggests that in order to develop effective policies in this area, it is necessary to move beyond a narrow understanding of ‘how individuals behave’, and to incorporate a more nuanced approach that encompasses behavioural influences in different societies, contexts and settings.

The editors draw together analyses and case studies from across the globe and from multi-disciplinary perspectives in order to offer a broad-based psychological, sociological and economic understanding of consumer behaviour. The expert contributors, from both academic and practitioner backgrounds – discuss in detail the barriers, challenges and opportunities that face governments in relation to policy and actions at local, national and supranational levels.

This fascinating book will prove a thought-provoking read for academics, researchers and students in the fields of environmental studies – particularly sustainability – and public policy. Practitioners and policy makers concerned with achieving sustainable lifestyles will find this book an invaluable reference tool.

Published November 2013 | Edward Elgar

Book: New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World

Edited by Catherine Mitchell, Jim Watson & Jessica Whiting
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Introduction - Conceptualising Energy Security

Catherine Mitchell & Jim Watson
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Energy Security: Geopolitics, Governance and Multipolarity

Caroline Kuzemko & Michael Bradshaw
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: The Energy Security-Climate Nexus and the Environment

Caroline Kuzemko, Antony Froggatt & Estelle Rouhaud
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Energy Security Policy in Britain: Markets, Complexity and Challenges

Iain Soutar & Jess Whiting
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Demand and Energy Security

Richard Hoggett, Nick Eyre & Malcolm Keay
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: People and Communities in Energy Security

Catherine Butler, Sarah Darby, Tom Henfrey, Richard Hoggett & Nicola Hole
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Supply Chains and Energy Security

Richard Hoggett
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: New Challenges in Energy Security: the UK in a multipolar world – Conclusions and Recommendations

Catherine Mitchell & Jim Watson
in C. Mitchell, J. Watson & J. Whiting (eds.) New Challenges in Energy Security – The UK in a Multipolar World
We are faced with the twin urgent challenges of delivering a low carbon and secure energy system. The last few years have seen Britain moving from being a net exporter to a net importer of energy. The threat of climate change has led to the slow but inexorable inclusion of environmental concerns in mainstream energy policy. Against this backdrop, economic and political power around the globe has altered, creating a complex, multipolar world. Rising concerns about the long term availability and price of oil, gas and uranium only add to the challenges facing Britain. This timely volume brings together key researchers and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines, including energy policy, international relations and supply chains, to explore the practical policy options in addressing energy security in Britain.
Published September 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Book: The Energy Security-Climate Nexus: Institutional Change in the UK and Beyond

Caroline Kuzemko
In the advent of important crises of both climate change and energy supply (in)security, questions are being asked about changes in energy governance. Caroline Kuzemko explains how and why change takes place and discusses the convoluted UK energy governance system that has emerged between 2000 and the present day. She applies a complex theoretical approach based on new institutional concepts of policy paradigm change, but which also utilises concepts of (de)politicisation and securitization. UK energy governance, like energy policy elsewhere, is moving from one heavily influenced by neoliberal economic ideas to one where state intervention is more commonplace. Moreover, the new governance system is informed not by one but by multiple perspectives on energy and governance – geopolitical, climate change and pro-market.
Published May 2013 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: The political economy of low carbon development

Matthew Lockwood
in F. Urban & J. Nordensvärd (eds.) Low Carbon Development - Key Issues
Low Carbon Development: Key Issues is the first comprehensive textbook to address the interface between international development and climate change in a carbon constrained world. It discusses the key conceptual, empirical and policy-related issues of low carbon development and takes an international and interdisciplinary approach to the subject by drawing on insights from across the natural sciences and social sciences whilst embedding the discussion in a global context.

The first part explores the concept of low carbon development and explains the need for low carbon development in a carbon constrained world. The book then discusses the key issues of socio-economic, political and technological nature for low carbon development, exploring topics such as the political economy, social justice, financing and carbon markets, and technologies and innovation for low carbon development. This is followed by key issues for low carbon development in policy and practice, which is presented based on cross-cutting issues such as low carbon energy, forestry, agriculture and transportation. Afterwards, practical case studies are discussed from low carbon development in low income countries in Africa, middle income countries in Asia and Latin America and high income countries in Europe and North America.
Written by an international team of leading academics and practitioners in the field of low carbon development, this book is essential reading for students, academics, professionals and policy-makers interested in the fields of low carbon development, climate change mitigation, climate policy, climate change and development, global environmental change, and environment and development.
Published March 2013 | Routledge

Chapter: Designing and Creating my Low-Carbon Home

Catherine Mitchell
in H. Herring (ed) Living in a Low-Carbon Society in 2050
By taking on the 1870s coastguard cottage in Cornwall in 2008, I was already committed to a certain level of renovation as the property was in a bad state; cold, leaky and damp. What it did offer was the perfect opportunity for me to create a low-carbon home and let me experience first-hand the process that many more homeowners will go through if there is to be an ambitious programme of low-carbon retrofitting in the UK. My main criteria were that the house be very energy efficient, modern and simple. It soon became clear that there were two ways in which this could be achieved – refurbish the old 1870s building or knock much of it down and then rebuild it. In the end, the latter was chosen because although the cost was not going to be very different, the energy efficiency of the house was going to significantly improved with the new timber frame walls.
There would be many more of these crossroads moments in the project. Attempting to refurbish or build a low-carbon house requires complex choices to be made at each stage of the design and build process. One set relates to the actual building – and skimmed over here – while the other set of choices relate to what is seen, and lived with, within the house – doors, windows, passive lighting, electrical goods, furniture, baths etc.
Published August 2012 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Low-Carbon Living in 2050

Nicola Hole
in H. Herring (ed.) Living in a Low-Carbon Society in 2050
What would it be like to live in a low carbon world? Where our houses are heated not by gas, but by solar energy; where our cars run not on oil but on electricity; and where the countryside is empty of cows but full of new energy and food crops. Governments may talk about reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by eighty per cent by 2050, but any pursuit of significant change will require drastic changes in either our energy supply or our lifestyles, or preferably a combination of both. Combining theory, case studies and speculative fiction, a range of contributors, from leading UK academics to pioneering renewable activists, create a compelling picture of the potential perks and pitfalls of a low carbon future.
Published August 2012 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Renewable Energy, in Global Energy Assessment

in Turkenburg, W. C., D. J. Arent, R. Bertani, A. Faaij, M. Hand, W. Krewitt, E. D. Larson, J. Lund, M. Mehos, T. Merrigan, C. Mitchell, J. R. Moreira, W. Sinke, V. Sonntag-O’Brien, B. Thresher, W. van Sark, E. Usher & E. Usher. Global Energy Assessment - Toward a Sustainable Future
The Global Energy Assessment (GEA) brings together over 300 international researchers to provide an independent, scientifically based, integrated, and policy-relevant analysis of current and emerging energy issues and options. It has been peer-reviewed anonymously by an additional 200 international experts. The GEA assesses the major global challenges for sustainable development and their linkages to energy; the technologies and resources available for providing energy services; future energy systems that address the major challenges; and the policies and other measures that are needed to realize transformational change toward sustainable energy futures. The GEA goes beyond existing studies on energy issues by presenting a comprehensive and integrated analysis of energy challenges, opportunities and strategies, for developing, industrialized and emerging economies. This volume is an invaluable resource for energy specialists and technologists in all sectors (academia, industry, and government) as well as policymakers, development economists and practitioners in international organizations and national governments.
Published August 2012 | Cambridge University Press | PDF

Book: Dynamics of Energy Governance in Europe and Russia

Edited by Caroline Kuzemko, Andrei V. Belyi, Andreas Goldthau & Michael F. Keating
Energy in Europe and Russia is in flux. The authors address key issues in this context and seek to analyze contemporary transition processes in the region’s energy sector. They look at whether and how transnational policy mechanisms can generate sufficient steering capacity to address pressing energy policy issues, including environmental concerns, energy transit or rapidly changing natural gas markets. Moreover, they explore the impact climate change concerns have on policy making in the energy sector and to what extent market mechanisms provide for answers to these issues. Instead of taking a geopolitical or neoliberal approach, this energy policy debate acknowledges the strong interdependence of global, regional and domestic influences on the processes.
Published March 2012 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Energy Policy in Transition: Sustainability with Security

Caroline Kuzemko
in C. Kuzemko, A. Belyi, A. Goldthau & M. Keating (eds.) Dynamics of Energy Governance in Europe and Russia 
Energy in Europe and Russia is in flux. The authors address key issues in this context and seek to analyze contemporary transition processes in the region’s energy sector. They look at whether and how transnational policy mechanisms can generate sufficient steering capacity to address pressing energy policy issues, including environmental concerns, energy transit or rapidly changing natural gas markets. Moreover, they explore the impact climate change concerns have on policy making in the energy sector and to what extent market mechanisms provide for answers to these issues. Instead of taking a geopolitical or neoliberal approach, this energy policy debate acknowledges the strong interdependence of global, regional and domestic influences on the processes.

Published March 2012 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: Summary for Policy Makers in IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation

Edenhofer, O., R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, D. Arvizu, T. Bruckner, J. Christensen,J.-M. Devernay, A. Faaij, M. Fischedick, B. Goldstein, G. Hansen, J. Huckerby, A. Jäger-Waldau,S. Kadner, D. Kammen, V. Krey, A. Kumar, A. Lewis, O. Lucon, P. Matschoss, L. Maurice, C.Mitchell, W. Moomaw, J. Moreira, A. Nadai, L.J. Nilsson, J. Nyboer, A. Rahman, J. Sathaye, J.Sawin, R. Schaeffer, T. Schei, S. Schlömer, R. Sims, A. Verbruggen, C. von Stechow, K. Urama, R.Wiser, F. Yamba, T. Zwickel (2011). In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y.Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C.  & V. Stechow (eds.) Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN)
The Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN), agreed and released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on May 9th in Abu Dhabi, assesses existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change. It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.
Published November 2011 | Cambridge University Press | PDF

Chapter: Technical Summary IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation

Arvizu, D., T. Bruckner, O. Edenhofer, S. Estefen, A. Faaij, M. Fischedick, G. Hiriart, O. Hohmeyer, K. G. T. Hollands, J. Huckerby, S. Kadner, Å. Killingtveit, A. Kumar, A. Lewis, O. Lucon, P. Matschoss, L. Maurice, M. Mirza, C. Mitchell, W. Moomaw, J. Moreira, L. J. Nilsson, J. Nyboer, R. Pichs-Madruga, J. Sathaye, J. Sawin, R. Schaeffer, T. Schei, S. Schlömer, K. Seyboth, R. Sims, G. Sinden, Y. Sokona, C. von Stechow,  J. Steckel, A. Verbruggen, R. Wiser, F. Yamba, T. Zwickel (2011) Technical Summary. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds.) Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN)
The Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN), agreed and released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on May 9th in Abu Dhabi, assesses existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change. It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.
Published November 2011 | Cambridge University Press | PDF

Chapter: Policy, Financing and Implementation

Mitchell, C., J. L. Sawin, G. R. Pokharel, D. Kammen, Z. Wang, S. Fifi ta, M. Jaccard, O. Langniss, H. Lucas, A. Nadai, R. Trujillo Blanco, E. Usher, A. Verbruggen, R. Wüstenhagen & K. Yamaguchi
in IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation
The Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN), agreed and released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on May 9th in Abu Dhabi, assesses existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change. It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.

Published November 2011 | Cambridge University Press | PDF

Chapter: UK

Catherine Mitchell & Bridget Woodman
in D. Fouquet & C. Jones (eds.) EU Energy Law Volume III - Book Two: Renewable Energy in the Member States of the EU
This unique loose-leaf publication, written by a team of leading experts from all 27 Member States, plus the US, China and India, and edited by the leading environmental lawyer Dr. Dörte Fouquet, gives a complete guide to the investment and support of renewable energy in the EU and abroad, essential to all those active in this area.

A loose-leaf publication has been chosen to ensure that it remains up to date in this fast-changing area. However, to facilitate the use of the loose-leaf publication, when updates are necessary, entire country chapters will be replaced, rather than individual pages. All country chapters will be renewed at least yearly; more often when new significant developments occur.
Published: December 2010 | Claeys & Casteels

Chapter: Regulation and Sustainable Energy Systems

Catherine Mitchell & Bridget Woodman
in R. Baldwin, M. Cave & M. Lodge (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Regulation
Regulation is often thought of as an activity that restricts behaviour and prevents the occurrence of certain undesirable activities, but the influence of regulation can also be enabling or facilitative, as when a market could potentially be chaotic if uncontrolled. This Handbook provides a clear and authoritative discussion of the major trends and issues in regulation over the last thirty years, together with an outline of prospective developments. It brings together contributions from leading scholars from a range of disciplines and countries.

Each chapter offers a broad overview of key current issues and provides an analysis of different perspectives on those issues. Experiences in different jurisdictions and insights from various disciplines are drawn upon, and particular attention is paid to the challenges that are encountered when specific approaches are applied in practice. Contributors develop their own distinctive arguments relating to the central issues in regulation and apply scholarly rigour and clear writing to matters of high policy-relevance. The essays are original, accessible, and agenda-setting, and the Handbook will be essential reading both to students and researchers and to with regulatory and regulated professionals.
Readership: Academics, scholars, and advanced students of Economics, Politics, Law, and Business and Management; Practitioners in regulatory bodies, regulated sectors, law firms, and consultancies.
Published September 2010 | Oxford University Press

Chapter: The development of renewable energy policy in the UK

Catherine Mitchell, Bridget Woodman & Jimmy Aldridge
in EU Energy Law, Renewable energy in the European Union, Part II: National Renewable Energy Support Schemes and Policies
Published 2010 | Claeys & Casteels BVBA publishing house

Book: Low Carbon Communities: Imaginative Approaches to Combating Climate Change Locally

Edited by: Michael Peters, Shane Fudge & Tim Jackson
Community action is a vital strategy in the fight against climate change and has increasingly informed government policy, academic inquiry and grassroots action since the start of this century. This timely and engaging volume explores both the promise of community-based action in tackling climate change and some of its limitations.
On the one hand, community-based action offers a meaningful way to achieve global targets and an avenue for renewing social relations at the local level. On the other, it challenges fundamental aspects of social organization in the modern economy and sometimes comes into conflict with wider structures and constraints. This volume brings together theoretical and practical perspectives on community action to mobilize social change towards a sustainable, low carbon future. The opportunities and challenges are considered through a diverse range of models and case studies. Fresh conceptual insights are provided and new light is shed on the policy implications and practical ramifications of establishing effective community engagement in efforts to combat climate change locally.
This book will prove a stimulating read for academic researchers in the fields of climate change science, local and national level policy analysis and governance research. Local authorities, development agencies and policy makers seeking to understand and to influence the behaviours and practices of ‘energy consumers’ and the communities in which they live will also find much to inspire them.
Published September 2010 | Edward Elgar Publishing

Chapter: Forging European Responses to the Challenge of Climate Change and Energy Resource Supply

Catherine Mitchell
in H. Prange-Gstöhl (ed.) International Science and Technology Cooperation in a Globalised World: The External Dimension of the European Research Area
In a globalized knowledge-economy, the European Union (EU) needs a new approach to its international science and technology (S&T) policies by focusing on improved coherence across the different tiers of government and by demonstrating leadership in tackling serious global challenges.

The contributors to this book analyze European S&T policies in several areas of global concern as well as by exposing both the pitfalls of policy coordination and its potential to contribute to a more coherent international S&T policy. They highlight the interactions between national, European and international policies, and explore how a common European policy for international S&T cooperation could work, and under which conditions. The book concludes that an EU external S&T policy is more likely to emerge if member states and the European Commission focus on a limited number of strategic priorities where Europe really can make a difference.
This book provides theoretical insights and practical solutions on how to equip the European Research Area with policies and instruments to ‘go global’ successfully, and on how to implement policy measures effectively and efficiently. As such, it will prove essential reading for policymakers in research, science and technology. It will also provide a stimulating read for academics and students of science and technology policies, European studies and international relations.
Published September 2010 |Edward Elgar Publishers

Book: The Political Economy of Sustainable Energy (2nd Edition)

Catherine Mitchell
This book analyzes the extent to which the current political paradigm is capable of meeting the challenges of climate change. Placing the UK in comparative perspective, leading energy expert Catherine Mitchell argues for a new way of approaching policy towards energy and sustainability
Published January 2010 | Palgrave Macmillan

Chapter: New coal build and the EU emissions trading scheme

Matthew Lockwood 
in C. Littlecott (ed.) A Last Chance for Coal: Making Carbon Capture and Storage a Reality
In this collection of viewpoints, Green Alliance reveals the growing support for carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of tackling the twin challenges of climate change and energy security. CCS technology appears to be ready, but it must be demonstrated urgently at commercial scale if it is to be deployed more widely in the coming decades.

These essays come from a variety of perspectives – politics, economics, business, unions, academia, think tanks and NGOs – but some important common themes emerge. First among these is that the demonstration of CCS requires dedicated public funding for a programme of different technologies. This is a strategically important undertaking, which must be funded and carried out at European level if it is to succeed. By doing so, the European Union can deliver on its international leadership ambitions, unlocking the potential for action by China and the USA.
But financial support to kick-start a new CCS industry is not in itself sufficient. Europe must reduce carbon emissions and cannot risk the construction of new unabated coal plants while CCS is being demonstrated. This collection therefore also looks in depth at how Europe can follow California’s experience with emissions performance standards. Such an approach would provide regulatory certainty for CCS and secure the future of the EU emissions trading scheme.
Green Alliance argues that funding for CCS demonstrations and the introduction of emissions performance standards must go together.
The time is now for the EU and its member states to act. In our carbon-constrained world CCS provides ‘a last chance for coal’.
Published October 2008 | Green Alliance | PDF

Chapter: Risk, Economics and Nuclear Power

Catherine Mitchell & Bridget Woodman
in D. Elliot (ed.) Nuclear Or Not? Does Nuclear Power Have a Place in a Sustainable Energy Future? 
The issue of nuclear energy excites strong emotions and there are widely differing views as to whether nuclear power can or should make a major contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. With the nuclear issue back on the agenda worldwide, this highly topical collection steers a path through these controversies, presenting the views of proponents of nuclear expansion, examining the challenges that face them and exploring the arguments of those who support alternative approaches.

Published March 2007 | Palgrave Macmillan

Book: New Nuclear Power; Implications for a sustainable energy system. A Warwick Business School and Green Alliance Report

Catherine Mitchell & Bridget Woodman
The government has four clear goals in energy policy: reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions; maintaining energy security; promoting competitive markets and ensuring affordable heating (as set out in the 2003 Energy White Paper). This report examines the impact that new nuclear power could have on the UK’s energy system and its energy goals.
Nuclear power provides around 20 per cent of the UK’s electricity (or about 8 per cent of its total energy). Assuming that a programme of new reactors will only replace existing plants, new nuclear build has, at best, only a limited potential to reduce the country’s CO2 emissions.
Given the financial and institutional commitments implied by a new nuclear programme, it is therefore essential to examine what impact it would have on the rest of the UK’s liberalised electricity market which provides 80 per cent of the UK’s electricity. Furthermore what impact would it have on the other 92 per cent of the UK’s broader energy market and on a move towards a more decentralised, sustainable energy system?
March 2006 | Green Alliance | PDF