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Dr Alan Puttock

Dr Alan Puttock

Associate Research Fellow

 5892

 Amory C255

 

Amory Building, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ , UK

Overview

In 2008 I gained a BSc in Physical Geography, from the University of Exeter and then went on to complete an MSc in Sustainable Development and Environmental Change (2009). The dissertations for both my BSc and MSc focused upon the relationships between land use and water quality. Furthermore, they made me realise that I wanted to continue undertaking environmental research.

In 2009 I started a PhD (awarded 2013), investigating water, sediment and carbon dynamics in semi-arid environments, undergoing vegetation change. My PhD was sponsored by the University of Exeter and Rothamsted Research, North Wyke. Additionally, research for my PhD involved extensive fieldwork in New Mexico, which was supported by summer fellowships from the University of New Mexico and Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research.

I am currently conducting research with Professor Richard Brazier, at the University of Exeter quantifying the hydrological and multiple other environmental impacts of reintroducing the Eurasian beaver to Great Britain.

Broad research interests:

Ecohydrology; soil erosion; water quality; biogeochemical cycling; land use and environmental change; environmental ecosystem services

Qualifications

BSc Physical Geography (University of Exeter)
MSc Sustainable Development and Environmental Change (University of Exeter)
PhD (University of Exeter and Rothamsted Research, North Wyke)

Research group links

Research

Research interests

My main interest is in land use or vegetation change and the connected alterations in ecosystem structure and function. I take an interdisciplinary approach to my research, combining: field work, laboratory analysis, remote sensing and geographical information systems.

Research projects

Beaver Projects: Devon, Cornwall and Forest of Dean

Beavers act as ecohydrological engineers and it is believed they could play an important role in the management of water resources. To inform the debate surrounding the reintroduction of beavers in the United Kingdom, it is essential to understand the impacts beavers have upon hydrology and associated ecosystem services including: flood risk management, water quality and drinking water provision.

These research projects seek to monitor the environmental impacts of beaver reintroudction at controlled trial sites in Devon, Cornwall and the Forest of Dean. 

River Otter Beaver Trial

In 2015 Natural England granted a five year licence to monitor beavers living wild upon the River Otter, Devon. The impacts of Eurasian Beaver upon English river systems are currently poorly understood, with the outcome of this pilot study having significant implications for river restoration and management. This project, the first of its kind in England, is monitoring the impacts of beavers upon the River Otter catchment. 

The River Otter Beaver Trial is led by Devon Wildlife Trust working in partnership with The University of Exeter, the Derek Gow Consultancy, and Clinton Devon Estates. Funding for the ROBT comes from Devon Wildlife Trust, the Royal Society for Wildlife Trusts, Peter de Haan Charitable Trust, University of Exeter and from the generous donations from the public made to the Devon Beaver Appeal.  

Previous Research Projects

Culm Grasslands Project
Culm grasslands (or Rhôs pastures), are an internationally important example of semi-natural wet pasture, which can provide multiple ecosystem services. However, these landscapes have been heavily impacted by land use change, resulting in a significant reduction in their spatial extent. It is believed that the restoration of Culm grassland could deliver multiple benefits for water and soil resources in South West England. Ecosystem services provided by Culm grassland might include: improved water storage, flood risk management, cleaner water, enhanced carbon storage and improved biodiversity.

This study seeks to increase understanding of the hydrological functioning, soil and water quality of Culm grasslands. In so doing, it will establish a solid knowledge base, from which management of these critical landscapes can progress. The work is funded as a partnership project between Devon Wildlife Trust (Working Wetlands), the Environment Agency and the UK Higher Education Innovation fund.

Mires Project

This project is based in Exmoor and Dartmoor National Parks in the south west of the UK and is primarily funded by South West Water. The research will establish an evidence base for the effectiveness of moorland restoration across Exmoor and  Dartmoor between 2010 and 2020.  The project involves a number of monitoring sites, where high-resolution sensor networks and samplers are deployed to quantify changes in water table depths, discharge and water quality as a function of restoration (primarily ditch blocking).

Links


Publications

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications


Puttock A, Brazier R, Graham H, Carless D (2018). Sediment and nutrient storage in a beaver engineered wetland. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Full text.
Puttock A, Graham HA, Cunliffe AM, Elliott M, Brazier RE (2017). Eurasian beaver activity increases water storage, attenuates flow and mitigates diffuse pollution from intensively-managed grasslands. Science of the Total Environment, 576, 430-443. Full text.
Puttock A, Cunliffe AM, Anderson K, Brazier RE (2015). Aerial photography collected with a multirotor drone reveals impact of Eurasian beaver reintroduction on ecosystem structure. Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems Author URL.  Full text.
(2014). Woody plant encroachment into grasslands leads to accelerated erosion of previously stable organic carbon from dryland soils. Journal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences, 119(12), 2345-2357. Abstract.  Full text.
(2013). Changes in ecosystem structure, function and hydrological connectivity control water, soil and carbon losses in semi-arid grass to woody vegetation transitions. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 38(13), 1602-1611. Abstract.
(2012). Stable carbon isotope analysis of fluvial sediment fluxes over two contrasting C<inf>4</inf>-C<inf>3</inf> semi-arid vegetation transitions. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 26(20), 2386-2392. Abstract.

Publications by category


Journal articles

Puttock A, Brazier R, Graham H, Carless D (2018). Sediment and nutrient storage in a beaver engineered wetland. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Full text.
Puttock A, Graham HA, Cunliffe AM, Elliott M, Brazier RE (2017). Eurasian beaver activity increases water storage, attenuates flow and mitigates diffuse pollution from intensively-managed grasslands. Science of the Total Environment, 576, 430-443. Full text.
Cunliffe AM, Puttock AK, Turnbull L, Wainwright J, Brazier RE (2016). Dryland, calcareous soils store (and lose) significant quantities of near-surface organic carbon. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 121(4), 684-702. Full text.
Puttock A, Cunliffe AM, Anderson K, Brazier RE (2015). Aerial photography collected with a multirotor drone reveals impact of Eurasian beaver reintroduction on ecosystem structure. Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems Author URL.  Full text.
(2014). Woody plant encroachment into grasslands leads to accelerated erosion of previously stable organic carbon from dryland soils. Journal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences, 119(12), 2345-2357. Abstract.  Full text.
(2013). Changes in ecosystem structure, function and hydrological connectivity control water, soil and carbon losses in semi-arid grass to woody vegetation transitions. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 38(13), 1602-1611. Abstract.
(2012). Stable carbon isotope analysis of fluvial sediment fluxes over two contrasting C<inf>4</inf>-C<inf>3</inf> semi-arid vegetation transitions. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 26(20), 2386-2392. Abstract.

Chapters

Hochstrasser T, Millington JA, Papanastasis V, Parsons A, Roggero P, Brazier R, Estrany J, Farina A, Puttock A (2014). The Study of Land Degradation in Drylands: State of the Art. In Mueller EN, Wainwright J, Parsons AJ, Turnbull L (Eds.) Patterns of Land Degradation in Drylands, Springer Netherlands, 13-54.  Author URL.

Publications by year


2018

Puttock A, Brazier R, Graham H, Carless D (2018). Sediment and nutrient storage in a beaver engineered wetland. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Full text.

2017

Puttock A, Graham HA, Cunliffe AM, Elliott M, Brazier RE (2017). Eurasian beaver activity increases water storage, attenuates flow and mitigates diffuse pollution from intensively-managed grasslands. Science of the Total Environment, 576, 430-443. Full text.

2016

Cunliffe AM, Puttock AK, Turnbull L, Wainwright J, Brazier RE (2016). Dryland, calcareous soils store (and lose) significant quantities of near-surface organic carbon. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 121(4), 684-702. Full text.

2015

Puttock A, Cunliffe AM, Anderson K, Brazier RE (2015). Aerial photography collected with a multirotor drone reveals impact of Eurasian beaver reintroduction on ecosystem structure. Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems Author URL.  Full text.

2014

Hochstrasser T, Millington JA, Papanastasis V, Parsons A, Roggero P, Brazier R, Estrany J, Farina A, Puttock A (2014). The Study of Land Degradation in Drylands: State of the Art. In Mueller EN, Wainwright J, Parsons AJ, Turnbull L (Eds.) Patterns of Land Degradation in Drylands, Springer Netherlands, 13-54.  Author URL.
(2014). Woody plant encroachment into grasslands leads to accelerated erosion of previously stable organic carbon from dryland soils. Journal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences, 119(12), 2345-2357. Abstract.  Full text.

2013

(2013). Changes in ecosystem structure, function and hydrological connectivity control water, soil and carbon losses in semi-arid grass to woody vegetation transitions. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 38(13), 1602-1611. Abstract.

2012

(2012). Stable carbon isotope analysis of fluvial sediment fluxes over two contrasting C<inf>4</inf>-C<inf>3</inf> semi-arid vegetation transitions. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 26(20), 2386-2392. Abstract.

A_Puttock Details from cache as at 2019-01-21 00:39:16

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