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 Elizabeth Hobson

Elizabeth Hobson

PhD Research Student

 Amory C360

 

Amory Building, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ , UK

Overview

I graduated from my undergraduate degree in 2016 with a first class honours in BA Geography. During this time, I became passionate about cultural geographies and creative methodologies. My dissertation examined the affective dimensions of the 2015 'dairy crisis' on South-West dairy farmers. Here, I gained an insight into the everyday lives of dairy farmers through an ethnographic interview methodology. This work stimulated my interest in speculative design and design fiction, cumulating in the combination of my ethnographic data with narratives from science fiction to imagine alternative futures for the UK dairy industry. 

In 2017 I graduated from the University of Exeter with a distinction in MRes Critical Human Geographies. Under the supervision of Professor John Wylie, I completed a thesis entitled, 'Dragons, Dowsing and Destiny: exploring the heritage and culture of ley-lines in medieval and modern East Anglia'. In this work I sought to explore how the emerging field of spectro-geographies offers a conceptual challenge to the current therapeutic landscapes literature. I performed an autoethnography of my own walking practices where I explored the complexity of temporality through the concept of healing. This work stimulated my interest in ontology in medical practice and the geographies of the body and forms the inspiration and basis for my PhD thesis. 

In 2017 I started my PhD entitled 'The dialectics of recovery: bringing neurodiversity into therapeutic geographies', under the supervision of Professor John Wylie and Professor Ian Cook. The process is funded by the Univrsity of Exeter through the Vice Chancellor's Scholarship for Academic Excellence award. This work seeks to explore the importance of temporality in understandings of mental health recovery. In doing so, this research will expand the concept of therapeutic geographies by bringing the literature into closer conversation with specral geographies. Practically, I will carry out ethnographic fieldwork with individuals and organisations that use art practices to explore mental health and recovery, as well as co-produce an autoethnographic film exploring the concept of temporality through themes of vulnerability, recovery, health and healing, in the context of my personal experiences of Borderline Personality Disorder and neurodiversity. 

Qualifications

MRes Critical Human Geographies, University of Exeter

BA Geography, University of Exeter

Research group links

Research

Research interests

My research analyses the intersections of the body, technology, materiality and ethics. 

Research projects

Project title: The dialectics of recovery: brining neurodiversity into therapeutic geographies 

Supervisors: Professor John Wylie and Professor Ian Cook 

Funding Body: University of Exeter, Vice Chancellor Scholarship for Academic Excellence 

Project description:

Spectrality has grown in popularity over the last decade, however, the concept has been neglected from geographical literature concerning health and wellbeing. This is suprising since the recently published 'Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change' (2013), joint initative from the Centre for Mental Health and Mental Health Network NHS Confederation, identified the importance of moving beyond conceptual frameworks for personal recovery in mental health which rely on temporal linearity. My project aims to bring spectral geographies into closer conversation with the therapeutic landscapes literature, and, in doing so, expand the concept of recovery. Practically, I will carry out ethnographic fieldwork with individuals and organisations that use art practices as a device to explore mental health and recover; as well as co-produce an autoethnographic short film exploring the concept of temporality through themes of vulnerability, recovery, health and healing in the context of my personal experiences of Borderline Personality Disorder and neurodiversity. 

Teaching

Supervision / Group

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