Loading content
Professor Gail Davies

Professor Gail Davies

Professor in Human Geography

 3346

 Amory C408

 

Amory Building, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ , UK

Overview

My work is situated at the intersection of Human Geography, Animal Studies, and Science and Technology Studies. My current research charts the changing geographies of laboratory animal science and seeks innovative ways of supporting policy-making and public engagement with complex issues in science and technology.

I am currently working on a 5 year programme of work on ‘The Animal Research Nexus: Changing Constitutions of Science, Health and Welfare’. This major grant is with collaborators Dr Beth Greenhough (Oxford University), Dr Pru Hobson-West (University of Nottingham), Dr Rob Kirk (University of Manchester) and Dr Emma Roe (University of Southampton).

My work is associated with the Natures, Materialities and Biopolitics (NAMBIO) Research Cluster in Geography and Egenis, the Centre for the Study of the Life Sciences, where I am an Honorary Senior Fellow. My other University responsibilities include being Chair of the Geography Ethics Committee.

I am the co-editor in chief for the RGS-IBG Open Access Journal Geo: Geography and Environment with Anson Mackay (UCL). 

I currently sit on the UK Animals in Science Committee (ASC), an advisory non-departmental public body, sponsored by the Home Office, which provides impartial, balanced and objective advice to the Secretary of State, to animal welfare bodies and within the European Union on issues relating to the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. I recently chaired the ASC subgroup reviewing harm-benefit analysis in the UK, which published its report in November 2017.

Please see teaching tab for office hours.

Qualifications

BA Hons in Geography (Oxford),
PhD in Human Geography (London)

Research group links

Research

Research interests

  • Developing social science research concepts and methods to understanding the changing contexts and challenges for laboratory animal research. With colleagues, I am working on the Animal Research Nexus Programme, which explores how the use of animals in scientific research is contingent upon a complex and changing network of relations and obligations across science and society. Exeter is leading the project exploring the changing patterns of patient and public involvement with the practices of animal research. Past work has explored the changing spaces of laboratory animal research from international collaborations around mutant mice, the growing attention to environment in post-genomics, the increasing demands of translational medicine, to the changing architectures of animal facilities. I have also worked on the material and discursive practices which shape how boundaries are understood and enacted in organ transplantation protocols and discussion of xenotransplantation. Insights from this research inform my work on the UK Government's Animals in Science Committee (ASC) 2013-2019.
  • Facilitating collaborative ways of working with policy and across disciplinary perspectives to inform learning and decision-making in contexts where there are plural values and scientific uncertainties. Past research includes the development of 'Deliberative Mapping' decision-support processes, with colleagues at SPRU, which integrates multi-criteria decision analysis with deliberation between citizens and stakeholders. I led the LASSH (Laboratory Animals in the Social Sciences and Humanities) network, using a structured and iterative process for developing a collaborative agenda for future humanities and social scientific research on laboratory animal science and welfare. I recently held an ESRC Impact Fellowship exploring challenges around the characterisation of benefits in the UK Harm-Benefit Analysis of animal research, which has informed my work chairing the UK Review of Harm-Benefit Analysis in the Use of Animals in Research.

Research projects

  • The Animal Research Nexus: Changing Constitutions of Science, Health and Welfare (2017-2022). This major grant is led by Professor Gail Davies (University of Exeter) with Dr Beth Greenhough (Oxford University), Dr Pru Hobson-West (University of Nottingham), Dr Rob Kirk (University of Manchester) and Dr Emma Roe (University of Southampton). This major award has three main aims: 1) to understand the historical interrelations between science, health and animal welfare 2) to identify challenges to animal research raised by scientific and social shifts around species and supply, professional roles, and patient engagements and 3) to facilitate dialogue with stakeholders, scientists and publics across the Animal Research Nexus. The overall programme seeks to identify what is required to remake the social contract around animal use in 21st century science and medicine.
  • Appraising Benefits in Laboratory Animal Research. An ESRC Impact Accelerator Award (2015-2017) developing the capacity for social science research to understand and inform the changing landscapes of translational biomedicine, with a specific focus on the process of appraising benefits in laboratory animal research.
  • In vivo skills training and the changing landscapes of biomedical research in the UK. A co-authored evaluation of the Integrative Pharmacology Fund (2015-2016). This research funded by the British Pharmacological Society and the project led by the University of Exeter.
  • Developing a collaborative agenda for humanities and social scientific research on laboratory animal welfare. A series of workshops funded by a Wellcome Trust Small Grant and University of Exeter Project Development Grant (2014-2015).  Co-applicants include Carrie Friese (LSE), Beth Greenhough (University of Oxford), Pru Hobson-West (University of Nottingham), Rob Kirk (University of Manchester) and Elisabeth Ormandy (UBC).
  • Making It Big? Tracing Collaboration in the Life Sciences. ESRC Genomics Forum Event (2011) with E Frow (ESRC Genomics Forum, Edinburgh) and S Leonelli (Egenis, Exeter). An international workshop developing comparative insights across projects in 'big biology’, exploring what is at stake, for both natural and social scientists, in projects seeking to rescale biology.
  • Biogeography and Transgenic Life. Three-year ESRC Research Fellowship (2007-2010) funding a series of projects exploring spatial issues in the production and coordination of mutant mouse resources, furthering understanding of international scientific collaboration, translational research and the spaces of postgenomics.
  • Locating Technoscience: Geographies of Science, Technology and Politics. ESRC Research Seminar Series (2005-2007) with B Balmer and C Thorpe (STS, UCL), A Hedgecoe (Sociology, Sussex), R Doubleday (Geography, Cambridge) and S Whatmore (OUCE, Oxford). ESRC seminar series building interdisciplinary and institutional conversations around the geographies of contemporary science and technology.
  • Deliberative Mapping: Appraising Options for Addressing ‘the Kidney Gap'. Wellcome Trust Grant (2001-2003) with J Burgess and S Williamson (UCL), A Stirling and S Meyer (SPRU) and M Eames (PSI). Project developing an innovative participatory methodology, combining scientific, expert-driven risk assessment techniques and deliberative approaches to public engagement. This was tested this through a full-scale public engagement exercise on the range of future options available for the treatment of human organ failure.

Research networks

Past PhD and Postdoctoral Students

I have supervised and acted as mentor for a broad range of PhD, post-doctoral students and artists with research interests in:

  • The geographies of science and technology, including innovative forms of public engagement on the boundaries between science and art;
  • The materials and spaces of socio-technical relations, including work on food, plants, animals, risk and biotechnology;
  • Nature-society relationships and alternative ways of thinking about and living alongside animals and nature.

I welcome enquiries from potential students and others interested in these and related areas.

  • Hilary Geoghagen (Geography) Harnessing Enthusiasm – Ecosocialities and Citizens as Early-Warning Systems (ESRC Future Research Leaders Fellowship)
  • Angela Last (Geography) Creating Common Futures – Embedding experimental methods for public engagement with innovative technologies (ESRC Post-Doctoral Fellowship)
  • Sara Peres (Geography/STS) Seed banking networks and the globalisation of plant biodiversity (ESRC Studentship)
  • Carina Fearnley (Geography/Earth Sciences) Understanding the dynamics of volcanic forecasting and warning systems (ESRC/NERC Studentship)
  • Richard Milne (Geography/STS) The role of research 'origin' in the formation of public attitudes towards biotechnology in the UK (UCL Institute of Human Genetics and Health)
  • Kezia Barker (Geography) Bio-security and discourses of national identity in New Zealand (ESRC Studentship)
  • Isobel Tomlinson (Geography) The 'organic' and the 'state': a critical analysis of the UK's organic action plan (ESRC Studentship)
  • Russell Hitchings (Geography) Plants and society: an ethnographic approach to the changing role of botanical life in London homes (ESRC Studentship)
  • Robert Doubleday (Geography) Political Innovation: corporate engagements in controversy over genetically modified foods (ESRC Studentship)
  • Kersty Hobson (Geography) Evaluating and understanding lifestyle change in environmental information programmes (ESRC Case Studentship)

Publications

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications


Davies GF (2018). Harm-Benefit Analysis: Opportunities for enhancing ethical review in animal research. LabAnimal Full text.
Davies GF, Greenhough B, Hobson-West P, Kirk R (2018). Science, Culture, and Care in Laboratory Animal Research: Interdisciplinary perspectives on the history and future of the 3Rs. Science, Technology, and Human Values Full text.
Niemi S, Davies GF (2016). Animal Research, the 3Rs, and the “internet of things”: Opportunities and Oversight in International Pharmaceutical Development. Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) Journal Full text.
Davies GF, Greenhough B, Hobson-West P, Kirk R, et al (2016). Developing a collaborative agenda for humanities and social scientific research on laboratory animal science and welfare. PLoS One Abstract.  Full text.
Davies GF (2014). Searching for GloFish™: Aesthetics, Ethics and Encounters with the Neon Baroque. Environment and Planning A: international journal of urban and regional research, 46(11), 2604-2621. Abstract.  Full text.
Davies GF (2013). Arguably big biology: Sociology, spatiality and the knockout mouse project. Biosocieties, 4(8), 417-431. Abstract.  Full text.

Publications by category


Journal articles

Joseph M, Neely AH, Davies GF, Sparke M, Craddock S (2019). Compound Solutions: Pharmaceutical Alternatives for Global Health. AAG Review of Books, 7(1), 47-58. Author URL.  Full text.
Davies GF (2018). Harm-Benefit Analysis: Opportunities for enhancing ethical review in animal research. LabAnimal Full text.
Davies GF, Greenhough B, Hobson-West P, Kirk R (2018). Science, Culture, and Care in Laboratory Animal Research: Interdisciplinary perspectives on the history and future of the 3Rs. Science, Technology, and Human Values Full text.
Niemi S, Davies GF (2016). Animal Research, the 3Rs, and the “internet of things”: Opportunities and Oversight in International Pharmaceutical Development. Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) Journal Full text.
Davies GF, Greenhough B, Hobson-West P, Kirk R, et al (2016). Developing a collaborative agenda for humanities and social scientific research on laboratory animal science and welfare. PLoS One Abstract.  Full text.
Leonelli S, Rappert B, Davies GF (2016). Introduction: Data Shadows: Knowledge, Openness and Absence. Science, Technology, and Human Values, 42, 191-202. Full text.
Davies GF (2016). Remapping the brain: towards a spatial epistemology of the neurosciences. Area, 48, 125-125.
Davies GF, Mackay A (2014). Introducing Geo: Geography and Environment. Geo: Geography and Environment
Davies GF (2014). Searching for GloFish™: Aesthetics, Ethics and Encounters with the Neon Baroque. Environment and Planning A: international journal of urban and regional research, 46(11), 2604-2621. Abstract.  Full text.
Davies GF (2013). Arguably big biology: Sociology, spatiality and the knockout mouse project. Biosocieties, 4(8), 417-431. Abstract.  Full text.
Frow E, Leonelli S, Davies GF (2013). Bigger, Faster, Better? Rhetorics and Practices of Large-Scale Research in Contemporary Bioscience. BioSocieties, 8(4), 386-396. Full text.
Davies GF (2013). Mobilizing Experimental Life: Spaces of Becoming with Mutant Mice. Theory, Culture and Society: explorations in critical social science, 30, 129-153. Abstract.  Full text.
Davies G (2013). Writing biology with mutant mice: the monstrous potential of post genomic life. Geoforum, 48, 268-278. Full text.
DAVIES G (2012). Caring for the multiple and the multitude: assembling animal welfare and enabling ethical critique. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 30, 623-638. Full text.
Fearnley CJ, McGuire WJ, Davies G, Twigg J (2012). Standardisation of the USGS Volcano Alert Level System (VALS): analysis and ramifications. Bulletin of Volcanology, 74, 2023-2036.
Davies G (2012). What is a humanized mouse? Remaking the species and spaces of translational medicine. Body & Society, 18, 126-155. Author URL.  Full text.
Greenhough B, Lorimer J, Davies G (2011). Corporal compassion: animal ethics and the philosophy of the body. ENVIRON PLANN D, 29, 188-190.
Davies G (2011). Playing dice with mice: building experimental futures in Singapore. New Genetics and Society, 30, 433-441. Full text.
Davies G (2010). Captivating behaviour: mouse models, experimental genetics and reductionist returns in the neurosciences. The Sociological Review, 58, 53-72. Full text.
Lorimer J, Davies G, Hinchliffe S, Hird M, Greenhough B, Roe E, Beisel U, Loftus A, Haraway D (2010). Collaborative book review of ‘When species meet’. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 28, 32-55.
Dwyer C, Davies G (2010). Qualitative methods III: animating archives, artful interventions and online environments. Progress in Human Geography, 34, 88-97. Full text.
Lorimer J, Davies G, Hinchliffe S, Hird MJ, Greenhough B, Roe E, Beisel U, Loftus A, Haraway D (2010). When species meet. ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING D-SOCIETY & SPACE, 28(1), 32-55. Author URL.
Davies GF (2010). Where do experiments end?. Geoforum, 41, 667-670. Full text.
Davies G, Dwyer C (2008). Qualitative methods II: minding the gap. Progress in Human Geography, 32, 399-406. Full text.
Davies GF (2008). Thinking, Reasoning and Writing with Animals in the Biosciences: book review essay. BioSocieties, 3, 446-451. Full text.
Burgess J, Stirling A, Clark J, Davies G, Eames M, Staley K, Williamson S (2007). Deliberative mapping: a novel analytic-deliberative methodology to support contested science-policy decisions. Public Understanding of Science, 16, 299-322. Author URL.
Davies G, Dwyer C (2007). Qualitative methods: are you enchanted or are you alienated?. Progress in Human Geography, 31, 257-266. Author URL.  Full text.
Davies G (2007). The funny business of biotechnology: better living through (chemistry) comedy. Geoforum, 38, 221-223. Full text.
Davies G (2006). Mapping deliberation: calculation, articulation and intervention in the politics of organ transplantation. Economy and Society, 35, 232-258. Full text.
Davies G (2006). Nature performed: environment, culture and performance. Cultural Geographies, 13, 476-477.
Davies G (2006). Patterning the geographies of organ transplantation: corporeality, generosity and justice. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 31, 257-271. Full text.
Davies G (2006). The sacred and the profane: biotechnology, rationality, and public debate. Environment and Planning A, 38, 423-443. Author URL.  Full text.
Davies G, Burgess J (2004). 'Challenging the view from nowhere’: citizen reflections on specialist expertise in a deliberative process. Health & place, 10, 349-361. Full text.
Davies G, Day R, Williamson S (2004). The geography of health knowledge/s. Health and Place, 10, 293-297. Full text.
Davies G (2003). A geography of monsters?. Geoforum, 34, 409-412. Full text.
Harrison C, Davies G (2002). Conserving biodiversity that matters: practitioners’ perspectives on brownfield development and urban nature conservation in London. Journal of Environmental Management, 65, 95-108.
Davies G (2000). Narrating the Natural History Unit: institutional orderings and spatial strategies. Geoforum, 31, 539-551. Full text.
Davies G (2000). Science, observation and entertainment: competing visions of postwar British natural history television, 1946-1967. Cultural Geographies, 7, 432-460. Full text.
Davies G (1999). Exploiting the archive: and the animals came in two by two, 16mm, CD-ROM and BetaSp. Area, 31, 49-58. Full text.

Chapters

Davies GF, Gorman R, Crudgington B (2019). Which patient takes centre stage? Placing patient voices in animal research. In Atkinson S, Hunt R (Eds.) GeoHumanities and Health, Springer. Full text.
Davies GF, Scalway H (2018). Diagramming. In Lury C, Fensham R, Heller-Nicholas A, Lammes S, Last A, Michael M, Uprichard E (Eds.) Routledge Handbook of Interdisciplinary Research Methods, Routledge. Abstract.  Full text.
Davies G (2011). Molecular Life. In Del Casino Jr V, Thomas M, Cloke P, Pannelli R (Eds.) A Companion to Social Geography, Wiley Blackwell, 257-274.
Davies GF (2010). Captivating behaviour: mouse models, experimental genetics and reductionist returns in the neurosciences. In Parry S, Dupre J (Eds.) Nature After the Genome, Wiley-Blackwell, 52-72.
Davies GF (2008). Science, observation and entertainment: competing visions of post-war British natural history television, 1946-1967. In  (Ed) Contemporary Foundations of Space and Place – Culture and Society: Critical Essays in Human Geography, Ashgate Press, 387-416.
Davies GF (2005). Exploiting the archive: and the animals came in two by two, 16mm, CD-Rom and BetaSP Area. In Thrift N, Whatmore S (Eds.) Cultural Geography: Critical concepts, Routledge.
Davies GF (2004). Wildlife. In Harrison S, Pile S, Thrift N (Eds.) Patterned Ground: ecologies of nature and culture London, Reaktion Press, 255-258.
Burgess J, Bedford T, Hobson K, Davies G, Harrison C (2003). (Un)sustainable consumption. In Berkhout F, Leach M, Scoones I (Eds.) Negotiating Environmental Change: New perspectives from social science, Edward Elgar, 261-291.
Davies G (2003). Researching the networks of natural history film-making. In Blunt A, Gruffudd P, May J, Ogborn M, Pinder D (Eds.) Cultural Geography in Practice, London: Edward Arnold, 202-217.
Davies G (2000). Virtual animals in electronic zoos: the changing geographies of animal capture and display. In Philo C, Wilbert C (Eds.) Animal Spaces, Beastly Places, London: Routledge, 243-267.

Reports

Davies GF, Golledge H, Hawkins P, Rowland A, Smith J, Wolfensohn S (2017). Review of harm-benefit analysis. in the use of animals in research. Animals in Science Committee,  London, Home Office. 87 pages.  Abstract.  Full text.
Lowe JWE, Collis M, Davies G, Leonelli S, Lewis DI, Zecharia AY (2016). An Evaluation of the Integrative Pharmacology Fund: Lessons for the future of in vivo education & training. British Pharmacological Society,  London. Full text.
Davies G, Burgess J, Eames M, Mayer S, Staley K, Stirling A, Williamson S (2003). Deliberative Mapping: Appraising Options for Addressing ‘the Kidney Gap’.
Murlis J, Davies G, others (2001). Public perception of the health impacts of climate change., Department of Health. 4 pages.
Harrison C, Davies G (1998). Lifestyles and the Environment., ESRC. Full text.

Internet publications

Davies GF, Scalway H (2012). MiceSpace.  Abstract.  Author URL.
Davies G (2009). The Geographies of knowledge’ Virtual issue of Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers.  Author URL. Web link.
Davies G, Balmer B, Barker K, Doubleday R, Milne R (2008). Locating Technoscience: an on-line reader exploring the geographies of science and technology.  Author URL. Web link.

Publications by year


2019

Joseph M, Neely AH, Davies GF, Sparke M, Craddock S (2019). Compound Solutions: Pharmaceutical Alternatives for Global Health. AAG Review of Books, 7(1), 47-58. Author URL.  Full text.
Davies GF, Gorman R, Crudgington B (2019). Which patient takes centre stage? Placing patient voices in animal research. In Atkinson S, Hunt R (Eds.) GeoHumanities and Health, Springer. Full text.

2018

Davies GF, Scalway H (2018). Diagramming. In Lury C, Fensham R, Heller-Nicholas A, Lammes S, Last A, Michael M, Uprichard E (Eds.) Routledge Handbook of Interdisciplinary Research Methods, Routledge. Abstract.  Full text.
Davies GF (2018). Harm-Benefit Analysis: Opportunities for enhancing ethical review in animal research. LabAnimal Full text.
Davies GF, Greenhough B, Hobson-West P, Kirk R (2018). Science, Culture, and Care in Laboratory Animal Research: Interdisciplinary perspectives on the history and future of the 3Rs. Science, Technology, and Human Values Full text.

2017

Davies GF, Golledge H, Hawkins P, Rowland A, Smith J, Wolfensohn S (2017). Review of harm-benefit analysis. in the use of animals in research. Animals in Science Committee,  London, Home Office. 87 pages.  Abstract.  Full text.

2016

Lowe JWE, Collis M, Davies G, Leonelli S, Lewis DI, Zecharia AY (2016). An Evaluation of the Integrative Pharmacology Fund: Lessons for the future of in vivo education & training. British Pharmacological Society,  London. Full text.
Niemi S, Davies GF (2016). Animal Research, the 3Rs, and the “internet of things”: Opportunities and Oversight in International Pharmaceutical Development. Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) Journal Full text.
Davies GF, Greenhough B, Hobson-West P, Kirk R, et al (2016). Developing a collaborative agenda for humanities and social scientific research on laboratory animal science and welfare. PLoS One Abstract.  Full text.
Leonelli S, Rappert B, Davies GF (2016). Introduction: Data Shadows: Knowledge, Openness and Absence. Science, Technology, and Human Values, 42, 191-202. Full text.
Davies GF (2016). Remapping the brain: towards a spatial epistemology of the neurosciences. Area, 48, 125-125.

2015

Davies GF (2015). Reading alongside the pipeline. Dialogues in Human Geography, 5(1), 108-110.

2014

Davies GF, Mackay A (2014). Introducing Geo: Geography and Environment. Geo: Geography and Environment
Davies GF (2014). Searching for GloFish™: Aesthetics, Ethics and Encounters with the Neon Baroque. Environment and Planning A: international journal of urban and regional research, 46(11), 2604-2621. Abstract.  Full text.

2013

Davies GF (2013). Arguably big biology: Sociology, spatiality and the knockout mouse project. Biosocieties, 4(8), 417-431. Abstract.  Full text.
Frow E, Leonelli S, Davies GF (2013). Bigger, Faster, Better? Rhetorics and Practices of Large-Scale Research in Contemporary Bioscience. BioSocieties, 8(4), 386-396. Full text.
Davies GF (2013). Mobilizing Experimental Life: Spaces of Becoming with Mutant Mice. Theory, Culture and Society: explorations in critical social science, 30, 129-153. Abstract.  Full text.
Davies G (2013). Writing biology with mutant mice: the monstrous potential of post genomic life. Geoforum, 48, 268-278. Full text.

2012

DAVIES G (2012). Caring for the multiple and the multitude: assembling animal welfare and enabling ethical critique. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 30, 623-638. Full text.
Davies GF, Scalway H (2012). MiceSpace.  Abstract.  Author URL.
Fearnley CJ, McGuire WJ, Davies G, Twigg J (2012). Standardisation of the USGS Volcano Alert Level System (VALS): analysis and ramifications. Bulletin of Volcanology, 74, 2023-2036.
Davies G (2012). What is a humanized mouse? Remaking the species and spaces of translational medicine. Body & Society, 18, 126-155. Author URL.  Full text.

2011

Greenhough B, Lorimer J, Davies G (2011). Corporal compassion: animal ethics and the philosophy of the body. ENVIRON PLANN D, 29, 188-190.
Davies G (2011). Molecular Life. In Del Casino Jr V, Thomas M, Cloke P, Pannelli R (Eds.) A Companion to Social Geography, Wiley Blackwell, 257-274.
Davies G (2011). Playing dice with mice: building experimental futures in Singapore. New Genetics and Society, 30, 433-441. Full text.

2010

Davies G (2010). Captivating behaviour: mouse models, experimental genetics and reductionist returns in the neurosciences. The Sociological Review, 58, 53-72. Full text.
Davies GF (2010). Captivating behaviour: mouse models, experimental genetics and reductionist returns in the neurosciences. In Parry S, Dupre J (Eds.) Nature After the Genome, Wiley-Blackwell, 52-72.
Lorimer J, Davies G, Hinchliffe S, Hird M, Greenhough B, Roe E, Beisel U, Loftus A, Haraway D (2010). Collaborative book review of ‘When species meet’. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 28, 32-55.
Dwyer C, Davies G (2010). Qualitative methods III: animating archives, artful interventions and online environments. Progress in Human Geography, 34, 88-97. Full text.
Lorimer J, Davies G, Hinchliffe S, Hird MJ, Greenhough B, Roe E, Beisel U, Loftus A, Haraway D (2010). When species meet. ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING D-SOCIETY & SPACE, 28(1), 32-55. Author URL.
Davies GF (2010). Where do experiments end?. Geoforum, 41, 667-670. Full text.

2009

Davies G (2009). The Geographies of knowledge’ Virtual issue of Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers.  Author URL. Web link.

2008

Davies G, Balmer B, Barker K, Doubleday R, Milne R (2008). Locating Technoscience: an on-line reader exploring the geographies of science and technology.  Author URL. Web link.
Davies G, Dwyer C (2008). Qualitative methods II: minding the gap. Progress in Human Geography, 32, 399-406. Full text.
Davies GF (2008). Science, observation and entertainment: competing visions of post-war British natural history television, 1946-1967. In  (Ed) Contemporary Foundations of Space and Place – Culture and Society: Critical Essays in Human Geography, Ashgate Press, 387-416.
Davies GF (2008). Thinking, Reasoning and Writing with Animals in the Biosciences: book review essay. BioSocieties, 3, 446-451. Full text.

2007

Burgess J, Stirling A, Clark J, Davies G, Eames M, Staley K, Williamson S (2007). Deliberative mapping: a novel analytic-deliberative methodology to support contested science-policy decisions. Public Understanding of Science, 16, 299-322. Author URL.
Davies G, Dwyer C (2007). Qualitative methods: are you enchanted or are you alienated?. Progress in Human Geography, 31, 257-266. Author URL.  Full text.
Davies G (2007). The funny business of biotechnology: better living through (chemistry) comedy. Geoforum, 38, 221-223. Full text.

2006

Davies G (2006). Mapping deliberation: calculation, articulation and intervention in the politics of organ transplantation. Economy and Society, 35, 232-258. Full text.
Davies G (2006). Nature performed: environment, culture and performance. Cultural Geographies, 13, 476-477.
Davies G (2006). Patterning the geographies of organ transplantation: corporeality, generosity and justice. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 31, 257-271. Full text.
Davies G (2006). The sacred and the profane: biotechnology, rationality, and public debate. Environment and Planning A, 38, 423-443. Author URL.  Full text.

2005

Davies GF (2005). Exploiting the archive: and the animals came in two by two, 16mm, CD-Rom and BetaSP Area. In Thrift N, Whatmore S (Eds.) Cultural Geography: Critical concepts, Routledge.

2004

Davies G, Burgess J (2004). 'Challenging the view from nowhere’: citizen reflections on specialist expertise in a deliberative process. Health & place, 10, 349-361. Full text.
Davies G, Day R, Williamson S (2004). The geography of health knowledge/s. Health and Place, 10, 293-297. Full text.
Davies GF (2004). Wildlife. In Harrison S, Pile S, Thrift N (Eds.) Patterned Ground: ecologies of nature and culture London, Reaktion Press, 255-258.

2003

Burgess J, Bedford T, Hobson K, Davies G, Harrison C (2003). (Un)sustainable consumption. In Berkhout F, Leach M, Scoones I (Eds.) Negotiating Environmental Change: New perspectives from social science, Edward Elgar, 261-291.
Davies G (2003). A geography of monsters?. Geoforum, 34, 409-412. Full text.
Davies G, Burgess J, Eames M, Mayer S, Staley K, Stirling A, Williamson S (2003). Deliberative Mapping: Appraising Options for Addressing ‘the Kidney Gap’.
Davies G (2003). Researching the networks of natural history film-making. In Blunt A, Gruffudd P, May J, Ogborn M, Pinder D (Eds.) Cultural Geography in Practice, London: Edward Arnold, 202-217.

2002

Harrison C, Davies G (2002). Conserving biodiversity that matters: practitioners’ perspectives on brownfield development and urban nature conservation in London. Journal of Environmental Management, 65, 95-108.

2001

Murlis J, Davies G, others (2001). Public perception of the health impacts of climate change., Department of Health. 4 pages.

2000

Davies G (2000). Narrating the Natural History Unit: institutional orderings and spatial strategies. Geoforum, 31, 539-551. Full text.
Davies G (2000). Science, observation and entertainment: competing visions of postwar British natural history television, 1946-1967. Cultural Geographies, 7, 432-460. Full text.
Davies G (2000). Virtual animals in electronic zoos: the changing geographies of animal capture and display. In Philo C, Wilbert C (Eds.) Animal Spaces, Beastly Places, London: Routledge, 243-267.

1999

Davies G (1999). Exploiting the archive: and the animals came in two by two, 16mm, CD-ROM and BetaSp. Area, 31, 49-58. Full text.

1998

Harrison C, Davies G (1998). Lifestyles and the Environment., ESRC. Full text.
Davies G (1998). Networks of Nature: Stories of Natural History Film-making at the BBC.  Author URL.  Full text.

Gail_Davies Details from cache as at 2019-05-21 04:00:58

Refresh publications

External Engagement and Impact

Committee/panel activities

Gail Davies was appointed to the Animals in Science Committee in 2013. The committee is a new advisory non-departmental public body of the Home Office, advising the Secretary of State on matters concerning the use of animals in scientific procedures.

Gail Davies was elected Member of the Research Committee of the Royal Geographical Society, from 2010-2013, building on her previous work as Secretary (2006-2009) and then Chair (2009-2012) of the Social and Cultural Geography Research Group of the RGS. She has also been a member of the Economic and Social Research Council College of Reviewers since 2009.


Editorial responsibilities

Gail is the inaugural editor of the new RGS-IBG open access journal Geo: Geography and Environment.

She has previously held editorial board positions for the journals The Sociological Review (2013-2018), the Cultural Geography Section of Geography Compass (2010-2016), Geoform (2001-2011), the Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers (2006-2012) and Public Understanding of Science (1997-2001).


External Examiner Positions

Gail is currently External Examiner for the Geography/Environmental Studies module group at The Open University (2016-2020) and MA in Nature, Society and Environmental Governance, University of Oxford (2016-2019).

She has previously worked as external examiner for the Undergraduate Honours Degree in Geography at the University of Oxford (2012-2015), the the MA in Society, Technology and Nature in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Lancaster University (2010-2016) and the MA in Geography (Research Methods at Durham University (2010-2013).


Invited lectures & workshops

Gail has given a large number of invited overseas talks and plenary lectures including at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Rome (Science and Society series, 2015); Chicago Centre for Contemporary Theory (as visiting fellow, 2014), the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago (2012), the World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences in Montreal (2011), the Sentient Creatures Conference at the University of Oslo (2010) and to the Department of Geography, Science Technology and Society Research Cluster and Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore (2009).


Media Coverage

Gail has also acted as advisor for a wide range of media and public engagement activities, including the curation of genetically-modified mice for the Center for PostNatural History, the development of anniversary programmes for the BBC Natural History Unit, and the evaluation of novel methods of public engagement with science for the Committee for Radioactive Waste Management and the New Economics Foundation. She is currently an associate of the critical art institution the Office of Experiments, directed by Neal White.

Teaching

Office Hours Summer Term 2019

Drop in: Wednesday 11.30-12.30

I will also be holding one other hour each week by appointment. Please email for details. 

 

Modules

2018/19


Supervision / Group

Postdoctoral researchers

  • Rich Gorman

Postgraduate researchers

Back | Edit Profile