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 Ian Cook

Ian Cook

Professor of Cultural Geography

 3251

 Amory C409

 

Amory Building, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ , UK

 Office hours:

Week 1: Wedensday 16 Jan 10-12
Week 2: Monday 21 Jan 4.30-5.30 + Friday 25 Jan 3.30-4.30 
Week 3: Monday 28 Jan 4.30-5.30 + Friday 1 Feb 3.30-4.30 
Week 4: Monday 4 Feb 4.30-5.30 + Tuesday 5 Feb 4.30-5.30
Week 5: Monday 11 Feb 4.30-5.30 + Friday 15 Feb 3.30-4.30
Week 6: Monday 18 Feb 10.30-11.30 + 4.30-5.30 

Overview

Ian is a cultural geographer of trade. He's interested in ways in which academics, filmmakers, artists, activists, musicians and journalists try to make tangible to 'consumers' the lives of those who make and grow their things. He runs the spoof shopping website followthethings.com which curates, and researches the making, discussion and impacts of over 80 examples of this work. Once the 100th has been researched and added to the site, he and collaborators are writing a handbook of 'follow the things' activism to inform and hopefully inspire new work in the genre. If you cannot wait, live reporting on the 'follow the things' project takes place on its blog, and on twitter, facebook and flickr

Within Geography at Exeter, Ian also coordinates the Cultural and Historical Geographies research group, a hive of fun-based productivity involving artists, academics, postdocs, postgrads, masters students and guests approaching geographical research, teaching and public engagement through collaborative, creative practice. In addition to followthethings.com, this approach to creative geographical practice has led Ian to work with artist and PhD student Paula Crutchlow and others on the Museum of Contemporary Commodities and to develop his solo/collaborative practice as a  LEGO memelord (kind of).

Beyond all of this, Ian lends what he knows about 'follow the things' cultural activism to the Fashion Revolution movement, where he's a member of the Global Coordination Team, co-authors its annual 40 question Quiz and led its annual 'Who Made My Clothes?' online course in 2017 and 2018.

Here, there and everywhere, Ian writes as 'Ian Cook et al' to acknowledge the collaborative nature of all of his work. His/their/our work is hard to own.

Qualifications

1986: BSc Human Sciences, University College London, UK

1992: MA Human Geography, University of Kentucky, USA

1997: PhD Human Geography, University of Bristol, UK

Career

Ian worked in the Department of Geography at the University of Wales, Lampeter  from 1993 to 1999 and in the School of Geography at the University of Birmingham from 2000 to 2007, before moving to Exeter where he is working right now.

Office hours

Week 1: Wedensday 16 Jan 10-12
Week 2: Monday 21 Jan 4.30-5.30 + Friday 25 Jan 3.30-4.30 
Week 3: Monday 28 Jan 4.30-5.30 + Friday 1 Feb 3.30-4.30 
Week 4: Monday 4 Feb 4.30-5.30 + Tuesday 5 Feb 4.30-5.30
Week 5: Monday 11 Feb 4.30-5.30 + Friday 15 Feb 3.30-4.30
Week 6: Monday 18 Feb 10.30-11.30 + 4.30-5.30 

Research group links

Research

Research interests

Ian et al is/are perhaps best known for developing the 'follow the thing' [ftt] approach to commodity geographies. Much of this ftt work has been undertaken via a series of small, collaborative projects exploring ways in which abstract commodity relations can be made 'real' enough to make a difference to the ways in which people imagine, understand and act as citizens and consumers.

Whilst taking massive doses of steroids, he/they/we managed to bring together, for the first time, in one place, for research purposes a wealth of academic and popular 'follow the thing' work in a spoof 'shopping' website called followthethings.com. This deliberately mixes up and confuses the research, publication, impact and teaching parts of academic labour. The FAQs are here.

The followthethings.com project has also sparked new collaborative work with artists and activists including the Museum of Comtemporary Commodities, Dust and Fashion Revolution.

Research projects

1) followthethings.com

followthethings.com is a research website with the look, feel and architecture of an online store, with Grocery, Fashion, Electronics, and other departments. It showcases ‘follow the thing’ films, books, academic journal articles, art installations, newspaper articles and undergraduate research. This work has followed nuts, t-shirts, tablet computers, perfume, books, cash, bullets and more. Most of the original work is freely available in-store to watch or download. Most also come with things to discuss. How was the original described by reviewers and audiences? Why, how, by whom and for whom was it made? How did its makers aim to grab its audiences? What (if anything) does this work seem to have done in the world? This site is made for teachers, researchers, journalists, film-makers, artists and other shoppers. It’s an online shop, a database, a resource and a field-site for people who want to learn from, and create, this kind of work. Its social media outpourings include a wordpress blog, a facebook page, a twitter feed, and a flickr group

followthethings.com emerged, in significant part, from a research and pedagogic partnership with Prof. Keith Brown of Arizona State University's School of Politics and Global Studies (for details see here). Most pages start as student research set in Ian's Geographies of Material Culture final year module, and have been updated and completed by nicely paid graduate interns. New pages continue to be added and, most recently, work with Finnish ftt media literacy activist Eeva Kemppainen and funded by the Kone Foundation has seen the updating and completion of additional examples of ftt cultural activism drawing on techniques of culture jamming, including:

Best, T., Gibson, T., Massey, B., Rees, C., Ross, K. & Sherman, J. (2018) Employee Visualisation Appendagefollowthethings.com 

Coakley, D., Johnson, J., Li, J., Mitchell, G., Saxton, J., & Weake, T. (2018) Sim*Sweatshop. followthethings.com

Hart, J. (2014) Pipe Trouble. followthethings.com

Jennings, E., Hargreaves, A., Goddard, M., Joslin, A., Whittington, M. & Bell, C. (2017) The Nike Email Exchange (NEE)followthethings.com

Weston Goodman, C. (2018) Beautiful Clothes, Ugly Realityfollowthethings.com 

2) The Museum of Contemporary Commodities

Founded with artist and PhD student Paula Crutchlow, The Museum of Contemporary Commodities (or MoCC) is neither a building nor a permanent collection of stuff - it's an invitation: to consider every shop, online store and warehouse full of stuff as if it were a museum, and all of the things in it part of our collective future heritage. MoCC invites people to imagine themselves as its curators with the power to choose what is displayed and how. To trace and interpret the provenance and value of these things and how they arrived here. To consider the effects this stuff has on people and places close by or far away, and how and why it connects them. What do we mean by things or stuff? Everything that you can buy in today's society. The full range of contemporary commodities available to consume. MoCC invites people to join us on our journey by browsing and adding to our collection, attending an event, becoming a researcher.

In 2015, Paula, Ian and their collaborators curated connections between trade-place-data-values in Finsbury Park, culminating in July in MoCC's 'Free Market' at Furtherfield's Galllery (watch the video here). From 17 October to 22 November 2015, MoCC was featured in 'The Human Face of Cryptoeconomics' exhibition at the Furtherfield Gallery in Finsbury Park, London (see here). In May 2016, the MoCC website and online collection was launched and a disused shop in Exeter was turned into an IRL MoCC for three weeks (watch the video here). In August 2017 MoCC opened for a long weekend in a lovely museum space -  the Pavilion Gallery of the RGS(IBG) on Exhibition Road in London - before moving into the RGS annual conference space the following week (Watch the video here). In each IRL location, visitors were asked to add commodities to the online collection, to answer and ask questions about them, to rate them according to values like 'freedom' and 'sociability', and to appreciate how the site's algorithms surface and change the collection's top commodities by 'attention', 'controversy', 'positive' and 'negative'. 

This project has been funded by the ESRC, AHRC, Arts Council England, Islington Council, Exeter City Council, the University of Exeter and the Department of Geography at the University of Exeter.

3) Dust

From 2014-5, Ian (via followthethings.com) was a project partner for an Arts Council England project called Bideford Black: the next generation based in the North Devon town's Burton Art Gallery and Museum. Bideford Black is a unique pigment sourced from a 'paint seam' in the geological strata of the area, which was commercially mined until 1968. Building on the first phase of the project, in which oral historical research was undertaken with former mineworkers, the 'next generation' project commissioned eight artists and one filmmaker to make new work for the Burton collection, and to develop ways of using it as a medium and inspiration.

After a 'Biddiblack' collecting fieldtrip in October 2014, Ian worked with artists Neville and Joan Gabie to create a body of work entitled ‘Dust’ which included a five screen video installation, a ‘cabinet of curiosities’ containing experimental making work with plastic and rubber, and a suit worn by Neville to work with the material. This work, along with their collaborative artist notebook, was exhibited at the Burton Gallery in October 2015. Watch the exhibition trailer (here) and read an exhibition review (here).  

4) Fashion Revolution

Since 2013, Ian has been working with a group of ethical fashion pioneers, NGOs, journalists, academics and others dedicated to marking 24 April (in 2013, the day the Rana Plaza garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing over 1,100 workers) as Fashion Revolution. Now active in over 90 countries worldwide, its key question to fashion brands and retailers is 'Who made my clothes?' Here, followthethings.com's fashion department and fashion ethics trump card game have been adopted as education resources on the Fashion Revolution website.

In June 2014, Ian directed a week-long public research project called 'Fashion ethics after the Rana Plaza collapse' from a disused shop in Exeter's Guildhall Shopping Centre. From 2014-2016, he was Fashion Revolution's Global Education & Resources lead, designed its Education Resources, curated its Research Library, Film Library, Do Something and Education Pinterest Boards and, in 2015, co-authored the movement's book How to be a fashion revolutionary with Sarah Ditty and Laura Hunter. A second edition of the book, with additional co-author Tamsin Blanchard, was published in 2018.

In June-July 2017 and 2018 Ian led a free 3 week online course with/for Fashion Revolution called 'Who made my clothes?' Check the details here

Publications

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications


Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L, Futerra, Blanchard T (2018). How to be a fashion revolutionary. Ashbourne, Fashion Revolution. Abstract.
Cook et al I (2018). Inviting construction: Primark, Rana Plaza and political LEGO. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 43(3), 477-495. Abstract.  Full text.
Cook et al I (2017). From 'follow the thing: papaya' to followthethings.com. Journal of Consumer Ethics, 1(1), 22-29. Full text.
Cook et al IJ, Crutchlow P, Mikayla, et al (2017). Museum of Contemporary Commodities, Pavilion Gallery, Royal Geographical Society, Exhibition Road, London (24-27 August).
Cook et al I (2016). Les géographies du numérique: on en veut encore! | More digital geographies, please. Justice Spatiale | Spatial Justice, 10 Full text.
Crutchlow P, Cook IJ, et al (2016). The Museum of Contemporary Commodities, online collection and website.  Abstract. Web link.

Publications by category


Books

Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L, Futerra, Blanchard T (2018). How to be a fashion revolutionary. Ashbourne, Fashion Revolution. Abstract.
Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L, Futerra (2015). Como ser um revolucionário da moda. Ashbourne, Fashion Revolution. Abstract.
Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L (2015). Cómo ser un revolucionario de la moda. Ashbourne, Fashion Revolution. Author URL.
Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L (2015). How to be a fashion revolutionary., Ashbourne: Fashion Revolution. Abstract.  Author URL.
Crang MA, Cook IJ (2007). Doing ethnographies. London, Sage. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Cloke P, Crang P, Philo C, Goodwin M, Painter J (2004). Practising human geography. London, Sage.
Cook IJ, Naylor S, Ryan J, Crouch D (2000). Cultural turns / geographical turns: perspectives on cultural geography. Harlow, Longman.
Cook IJ, Crang M (1995). Doing ethnographies. Norwich, Geobooks. Author URL.

Journal articles

Cook et al I (2018). Inviting construction: Primark, Rana Plaza and political LEGO. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 43(3), 477-495. Abstract.  Full text.
Cook et al I (2017). From 'follow the thing: papaya' to followthethings.com. Journal of Consumer Ethics, 1(1), 22-29. Full text.
Cook et al I (2016). Les géographies du numérique: on en veut encore! | More digital geographies, please. Justice Spatiale | Spatial Justice, 10 Full text.
Philo C, Askins K, Cook IJ (2015). 'Civic Geographies: pictures and other things at an exhibition.'. Acme: an international e-journal for critical geographies, 14(2), 355-366. Abstract.  Full text.
Hudson C, Cook IJ (2015). Occupy RGS(IBG) 2012. Acme: an international e-journal for critical geographies, 14(2), 413-421. Full text.
Cook et al I (2014). 'Afters': 26 authors, a blog and a 'workshop imagination geared to writing'. Cultural geographies, 21(1), 135-140.
Cook et al I (2014). 'Organic Public Geographies and REF Impact'. Acme: an international e-journal for critical geographies, 13(1), 47-51.
Cook et al I (2014). Fabrication critique et web 2.0: les géographies matérielles de followthethings.com. Géographie et cultures, 91-92, 23-48. Abstract.  Full text.
Cook IJ, Hobson K, Hallett L, Guthman J, Murphy A, Hulme A, Sheller M, Crewe L, Nally D, Roe E, et al (2011). Geographies of food: afters. Progress in human geography, 35(1), 104-120. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Hawkins H, Sacks S, Rawling E, Griffiths HG, Swift D, Evans J, Rothnie G, Wilson J, Williams A, et al (2011). Organic public geographies: 'making the connection'. Antipode, 43(4), 909-926.
Cook IJ, Hawkins H, Sacks S, Rawling E, Griffiths H, Swift D, Evans J, Rothnie G, Wilson J, Williams A, et al (2011). Organic public geographies: 'making the connection'. Antipode, 43(3), 909-926. Abstract.
Cook et al I (2008). Geographies of food: mixing. Progress in Human Geography, 32(6), 821-833.
Anderson J, Askins K, Cook IJ, Desforges L, Evans J, Fannin M, Fuller D, Griffiths H, Lambert D, Lee R, et al (2008). What is geography's contribution to making citizens. Geography, 93(1), 34-39. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Evans J, Griffiths H, Morris R, Wrathmell S (2007). 'It's more than just what it is': defetishising commodities, expanding fields, mobilising change…. Geoforum, 38(6), 1113-1126. Abstract.
Evans J, Cook IJ, Griffiths H (2007). Creativity, group pedagogy & social action: a departure from Gough. Educational philosophy and theory, 40(2), 330-345.
Cook IJ, Harrison M (2007). Follow the thing: ‘West Indian hot pepper sauce’. Space and culture, 10(1), 40-63. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Evans J, Griffiths H, Mayblin L, Payne R, Roberts D (2007). ‘Made in… ?’ appreciating the everyday geographies of connected lives?. Teaching geography(Summer), 80-83.
Cook et al I (2006). Geographies of food: following. Progress in human geography, 30(5), 655-666.
Cook IJ, Williams A, Motamedi M (2006). Stuff geography. Primary Geographer(Autumn), 38-39.
Cook et al I (2004). Follow the thing: papaya. Antipode, 36(4), 642-664. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Harrison M (2003). ‘Cross over food: re-materialising postcolonial geographies’. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 28(3), 296-331. Abstract.
Cook et al I (2001). Social sculpture and connective aesthetics: Shelley Sacks’s ‘Exchange values’. Ecumene, 7(3), 337-343. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Angus T, Evans J (2001). ‘A manifesto for cyborg pedagogy’. International research in geographical & environmental education, 10(2), 195-201. Full text.
Cook IJ (2000). 'Nothing can ever be a case of us and them again': exploring the politics of difference through border pedagogy & student journal writing. Journal of geography in higher education, 24(1), 13-27. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (1998). Biographies & geographies: consumer understandings of the origins of foods. British food journal, 100(3), 162-167. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Crang P (1996). 'The world on a plate': culinary culture, displacement and geographical knowledges. Journal of material culture, 1(2), 131-153. Abstract.  Author URL.

Chapters

Cook IJ, Bagelman J (2019). Enacting public geographies. In Kobayashi A (Ed) International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Elsevier.
Cook et al I (2017). followthethings.com: analysing relations between the making, reception and impact of commodity activism in a transmedia world. In Söderström O, Kloetzer L (Eds.) Innovations sociales: comment les sciences sociales transforment la société, Neuchátel, Switzerland: University of Neuchátel, 46-60.  Author URL.  Full text.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2016). Consumption and its geographies. In Daniels P, Bradshaw M, Shaw D, Sidaway J, Hall T (Eds.) An introduction to human geography, Harlow: Pearson, 379-398.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2014). The World on a Plate: Culinary Culture, Displacement and Geographical Knowledges. In Pilcher J (Ed) Food History: Critical and Primary Sources, London: Bloomsbury. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Jackson P, Hayes-Conroy A, Abrahamsson S, Sandover R, Sheller M, Henderson H, Hallett IV L, Imai S, Maye D, et al (2013). Food’s cultural geographies: texture, creativity & publics. In Johnson N, Schein R, Winders J (Eds.) The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Cultural Geography, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 343-354.  Author URL.
Cook IJ, Crang, P. (2012). Consumption & its geographies. In Daniels P, Bradshaw M, Shaw D, Sidaway J (Eds.) An introduction to human geography, Harlow: Pearson, 396-415.
Cook IJ, Woodyer T (2012). Lives of things. In Sheppard E, Barnes T, Peck J (Eds.) Wiley-Blackwell companion to economic geography, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 226-241.  Author URL.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2012). The world on a plate: culinary culture, displacement and geographical knowledges. In Steger M (Ed) Globalization & culture: volume 1, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 230-252.
Allsop D, Allen H, Clare H, Cook IJ, Raxter H, Upton C, Williams A (2010). Ethnography & participant observation. In Gomez B, III JPJ (Eds.) Research methods in geography: a critical introduction, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Tolia-Kelly DP (2010). Material geographies. In Hicks D, Beaudry M (Eds.) Oxford handbook of material culture studies, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Abstract.
Cook et al I (2008). Geographies of food: following. In Tucker L (Ed) Bioneering: hybrid investigations of food, Irvine, California: University of California, Irvine, 126-139.
Cook et al I (2008). Pozicioniranost / situirano znanje. In Atkinson D, Jackson P, Sibley D, Washbourne N (Eds.) Kulturna geografija: kriticki rjecnik klucnih pojmova, Zagreb: Disput, 41-53.
Cook IJ, Harrison M, Lacey C (2006). The power of shopping. In Wilson R (Ed) Post party politics, London: Involve, 42-46.
Cook IJ (2005). Participant Observation. In Flowerdew R, Martin D (Eds.) Methods in human geography: a guide for new students, Harlow: Prentice Hall, 167-188.
Cook et al I (2005). Positionality / situated knowledge. In Atkinson D, Jackson P, Sibley D, Washbourne N (Eds.) Cultural geography: a critical dictionary of key ideas, London: IB Tauris, 16-26.
Cook IJ (2004). Trade. In Harrison S, Pile S, Thrift N (Eds.) Patterned ground: ecologies of culture and nature, London: Reaktion, 124-126.
Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (2004). Tropics of consumption: getting with the fetish of ‘exotic’ fruit?. In Reimer S, Hughes A (Eds.) Geographies of commodity chains, London: Routledge, 173-192.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2004). ‘The world on a plate: culinary culture, displacement & geographical knowledges’. In Thrift N, Whatmore S (Eds.) Cultural geography: critical concepts in the social sciences (volume 1), Routledge.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2003). ‘The world on a plate: culinary culture, displacement & geographical knowledges’. In Clarke D, Doel M, Housiaux K (Eds.) The consumption reader, London: Routledge, 113-116.
Cook IJ (2001). ‘You want to be careful you don’t end up like Ian. He’s all over the place’: autobiography in/of an expanded field. In Moss P (Ed) Placing autobiography in geography, Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 99-120.
Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (2000). 'Have you got the customer's permission?' Category management and circuits of knowledge in the UK food business. In Bryson J, Daniels P, Henry N, Pollard J (Eds.) Knowledge, space, economy, London: Routledge, 242-260.
Cook IJ (2000). Culture and political economy: introduction. In Cook IJ, Crouch D, Naylor S, Ryan J (Eds.) Cultural turns / geographical turns: perspectives on cultural geography, London: Pearson.
Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (2000). Regions to be cheerful? Culinary authenticity & its geographies. In Cook I, Crouch D, Naylor S, Ryan J (Eds.) Cultural turns / geographical turns: perspectives on cultural geography, Harlow: Longman, 109-139.
Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (1999). Eating into Britishness: multicultural imaginaries and the identity politics of food. In Roseneil S, Seymour J (Eds.) Practising identities: power & resistance, Oxford: Macmillan, 223-248.
Cook IJ (1999). New fruits and vanity: symbolic production in the global food economy. In Bryson J, Henry N, Keeble D, Martin R (Eds.) The economic geography reader: producing & consuming global capitalism, Chichester: Wiley, 301-306.
Cook IJ (1997). Participant observation. In Flowerdew R, Martin D (Eds.) Methods in human geography: a guide for students doing research projects, Harlow: Longman, 127-149.
Cook IJ (1995). Constructing the exotic: the case of tropical fruit. In Allen J, Massey D (Eds.) Geographical worlds, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 137-149.
Cook IJ (1994). New fruits and vanity: symbolic production in the global food economy. In Bonanno A, Busch L, Friedland WH, Gouveia L, Mingione E (Eds.) From Columbus to ConAgra: the globalisation of agriculture and food, Lawrence, KA: University Press of Kansas, 232-248.

Internet publications

Cook et al I (2017). What to do if you find a cry for help in your Christmas presents this year. The Conversation 22 December. Web link.
Crutchlow P, Cook IJ, et al (2016). The Museum of Contemporary Commodities, online collection and website.  Abstract. Web link.
(2013). Ethical Trade Trumps card game (make-it-yourself card game with instructions, card template and sample cards, scanned & uploaded to flickr.com).  Author URL. Web link.
(2012). Made in Lego (re-creations of scenes from followthethings.com pages in Lego, photographed & published on flickr.com).  Author URL. Web link.
(2011). @followthethings (the followthethings.com twitter feed).  Author URL. Web link.
Cook IJ (2011). What would you say to the person who made your shirt? Eden Project Blog.  Author URL. Web link.
(2011). followtheblog.org (the followthethings.com blog).  Author URL. Web link.
Cook IJ, Parkinson A (2011). followthethings champion shopper missions (a series of online missions on the website missionexplore.net).  Author URL. Web link.
(2011). followthethings.com.  Full text. Web link.
Cook et al I (2009). Writing collaboration: a work in progress.  Abstract.  Author URL.
Griffiths H, Cook IJ, Evans J (2008). Making the connection. mobile phone geographies.  Author URL.
Griffiths H, Cook IJ (2008). Think-piece on children and Young People’s Geographies.  Author URL.
Cook et al I (2002). Commodities: the DNA of capitalism.  Abstract.  Author URL.

Publications by year


2019

Cook IJ, Bagelman J (2019). Enacting public geographies. In Kobayashi A (Ed) International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Elsevier.

2018

Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L, Futerra, Blanchard T (2018). How to be a fashion revolutionary. Ashbourne, Fashion Revolution. Abstract.
Cook et al I (2018). Inviting construction: Primark, Rana Plaza and political LEGO. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 43(3), 477-495. Abstract.  Full text.

2017

Cook et al I (2017). From 'follow the thing: papaya' to followthethings.com. Journal of Consumer Ethics, 1(1), 22-29. Full text.
Cook et al IJ, Crutchlow P, Mikayla, et al (2017). Museum of Contemporary Commodities, Pavilion Gallery, Royal Geographical Society, Exhibition Road, London (24-27 August).
Cook IJ, Kemppainen E (2017). Tarvitsemme Lisää Tutkimusta. Voima, 7, 24-25. Author URL.
Cook et al I (2017). What to do if you find a cry for help in your Christmas presents this year. The Conversation 22 December. Web link.
Cook et al I (2017). followthethings.com: analysing relations between the making, reception and impact of commodity activism in a transmedia world. In Söderström O, Kloetzer L (Eds.) Innovations sociales: comment les sciences sociales transforment la société, Neuchátel, Switzerland: University of Neuchátel, 46-60.  Author URL.  Full text.

2016

Cook IJ, Crang P (2016). Consumption and its geographies. In Daniels P, Bradshaw M, Shaw D, Sidaway J, Hall T (Eds.) An introduction to human geography, Harlow: Pearson, 379-398.
Cook et al I (2016). Les géographies du numérique: on en veut encore! | More digital geographies, please. Justice Spatiale | Spatial Justice, 10 Full text.
(2016). Museum of Contemporary Commodities, shop-gallery, 87 Fore Street, Exeter (4 - 21 May).  Abstract.
Crutchlow P, Cook IJ, et al (2016). Museum of Contemporary Commodities, shop-gallery, 87 Fore Street, Exeter (4 - 21 May).  Abstract.
Crutchlow P, Cook IJ, et al (2016). The Museum of Contemporary Commodities, online collection and website.  Abstract. Web link.

2015

Philo C, Askins K, Cook IJ (2015). 'Civic Geographies: pictures and other things at an exhibition.'. Acme: an international e-journal for critical geographies, 14(2), 355-366. Abstract.  Full text.
Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L, Futerra (2015). Como ser um revolucionário da moda. Ashbourne, Fashion Revolution. Abstract.
Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L (2015). Cómo ser un revolucionario de la moda. Ashbourne, Fashion Revolution. Author URL.
Gabie N, Gabie J, Cook IJ (2015). Dust, in 'Bideford Black, the Next Generation' exhibition, Burton Art Gallery & Museum, Bideford, UK (3 October - 13 November).  Abstract.  Author URL.
Ditty S, Cook IJ, Hunter L (2015). How to be a fashion revolutionary., Ashbourne: Fashion Revolution. Abstract.  Author URL.
(2015). Museum of Contemporary Commodities 'Free Market', Furtherfield Gallery, Finsbury Park, London (17-19 July).  Abstract.
Crutchlow P, Cook IJ, Foote G, Garbelotto C, Ballard A, et al (2015). Museum of Contemporary Commodities 'Free Market', Furtherfield Gallery, Finsbury Park, London (17-19 July).  Abstract.
Cook IJ, Crutchlow P, Foote G, Garbelotto C, Ballard A, et al (2015). Museum of Contemporary Commodities, in 'The Human Face of Cryptoeconomics' exhibition, Furtherfield Gallery, Finsbury Park, London (17 October - 22 November).
Hudson C, Cook IJ (2015). Occupy RGS(IBG) 2012. Acme: an international e-journal for critical geographies, 14(2), 413-421. Full text.

2014

Cook et al I (2014). 'Afters': 26 authors, a blog and a 'workshop imagination geared to writing'. Cultural geographies, 21(1), 135-140.
Cook et al I (2014). 'Organic Public Geographies and REF Impact'. Acme: an international e-journal for critical geographies, 13(1), 47-51.
Cook et al I (2014). Fabrication critique et web 2.0: les géographies matérielles de followthethings.com. Géographie et cultures, 91-92, 23-48. Abstract.  Full text.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2014). The World on a Plate: Culinary Culture, Displacement and Geographical Knowledges. In Pilcher J (Ed) Food History: Critical and Primary Sources, London: Bloomsbury. Abstract.

2013

(2013). Ethical Trade Trumps card game (make-it-yourself card game with instructions, card template and sample cards, scanned & uploaded to flickr.com).  Author URL. Web link.
Cook IJ, Jackson P, Hayes-Conroy A, Abrahamsson S, Sandover R, Sheller M, Henderson H, Hallett IV L, Imai S, Maye D, et al (2013). Food’s cultural geographies: texture, creativity & publics. In Johnson N, Schein R, Winders J (Eds.) The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Cultural Geography, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 343-354.  Author URL.

2012

Cook IJ, Crang, P. (2012). Consumption & its geographies. In Daniels P, Bradshaw M, Shaw D, Sidaway J (Eds.) An introduction to human geography, Harlow: Pearson, 396-415.
Cook IJ, Woodyer T (2012). Lives of things. In Sheppard E, Barnes T, Peck J (Eds.) Wiley-Blackwell companion to economic geography, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 226-241.  Author URL.
(2012). Made in Lego (re-creations of scenes from followthethings.com pages in Lego, photographed & published on flickr.com).  Author URL. Web link.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2012). The world on a plate: culinary culture, displacement and geographical knowledges. In Steger M (Ed) Globalization & culture: volume 1, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 230-252.

2011

(2011). @followthethings (the followthethings.com twitter feed).  Author URL. Web link.
Cook IJ, Hobson K, Hallett L, Guthman J, Murphy A, Hulme A, Sheller M, Crewe L, Nally D, Roe E, et al (2011). Geographies of food: afters. Progress in human geography, 35(1), 104-120. Abstract.
Cook et al I (2011). Hartmut Bitomsky's 'Dust': a reaction more than a review. Science as culture, 20(1), 115-119.
Cook IJ, Elesedy A, LeGrand G, Woolford R (2011). Moving stuff: de-carbonising maritime logistics, international wind transport & material geographies: 'Ahead of the curve' radio show, Phonic FM.  Author URL.
Cook IJ, Shakes, Lizzie, Audaye, Abdulla, Emma (2011). Occupied:'Ahead of the curve' radio show, Phonic FM.  Author URL.
Cook IJ, Hawkins H, Sacks S, Rawling E, Griffiths HG, Swift D, Evans J, Rothnie G, Wilson J, Williams A, et al (2011). Organic public geographies: 'making the connection'. Antipode, 43(4), 909-926.
Cook IJ, Hawkins H, Sacks S, Rawling E, Griffiths H, Swift D, Evans J, Rothnie G, Wilson J, Williams A, et al (2011). Organic public geographies: 'making the connection'. Antipode, 43(3), 909-926. Abstract.
Cook IJ (2011). What would you say to the person who made your shirt? Eden Project Blog.  Author URL. Web link.
(2011). followtheblog.org (the followthethings.com blog).  Author URL. Web link.
Cook IJ, Parkinson A (2011). followthethings champion shopper missions (a series of online missions on the website missionexplore.net).  Author URL. Web link.
(2011). followthethings.com.  Full text. Web link.

2010

Allsop D, Allen H, Clare H, Cook IJ, Raxter H, Upton C, Williams A (2010). Ethnography & participant observation. In Gomez B, III JPJ (Eds.) Research methods in geography: a critical introduction, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Tolia-Kelly DP (2010). Material geographies. In Hicks D, Beaudry M (Eds.) Oxford handbook of material culture studies, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Abstract.

2009

Cook et al I (2009). Writing collaboration: a work in progress.  Abstract.  Author URL.

2008

Cook et al I (2008). Geographies of food: following. In Tucker L (Ed) Bioneering: hybrid investigations of food, Irvine, California: University of California, Irvine, 126-139.
Cook et al I (2008). Geographies of food: mixing. Progress in Human Geography, 32(6), 821-833.
Griffiths H, Cook IJ, Evans J (2008). Making the connection. mobile phone geographies.  Author URL.
Cook et al I (2008). Pozicioniranost / situirano znanje. In Atkinson D, Jackson P, Sibley D, Washbourne N (Eds.) Kulturna geografija: kriticki rjecnik klucnih pojmova, Zagreb: Disput, 41-53.
Griffiths H, Cook IJ (2008). Think-piece on children and Young People’s Geographies.  Author URL.
Anderson J, Askins K, Cook IJ, Desforges L, Evans J, Fannin M, Fuller D, Griffiths H, Lambert D, Lee R, et al (2008). What is geography's contribution to making citizens. Geography, 93(1), 34-39. Abstract.

2007

Cook IJ, Evans J, Griffiths H, Morris R, Wrathmell S (2007). 'It's more than just what it is': defetishising commodities, expanding fields, mobilising change…. Geoforum, 38(6), 1113-1126. Abstract.
Evans J, Cook IJ, Griffiths H (2007). Creativity, group pedagogy & social action: a departure from Gough. Educational philosophy and theory, 40(2), 330-345.
Crang MA, Cook IJ (2007). Doing ethnographies. London, Sage. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Harrison M (2007). Follow the thing: ‘West Indian hot pepper sauce’. Space and culture, 10(1), 40-63. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Evans J, Griffiths H, Mayblin L, Payne R, Roberts D (2007). ‘Made in… ?’ appreciating the everyday geographies of connected lives?. Teaching geography(Summer), 80-83.

2006

Cook et al I (2006). Geographies of food: following. Progress in human geography, 30(5), 655-666.
Cook IJ, Williams A, Motamedi M (2006). Stuff geography. Primary Geographer(Autumn), 38-39.
Cook IJ, Harrison M, Lacey C (2006). The power of shopping. In Wilson R (Ed) Post party politics, London: Involve, 42-46.

2005

Cook IJ (2005). Participant Observation. In Flowerdew R, Martin D (Eds.) Methods in human geography: a guide for new students, Harlow: Prentice Hall, 167-188.
Cook et al I (2005). Positionality / situated knowledge. In Atkinson D, Jackson P, Sibley D, Washbourne N (Eds.) Cultural geography: a critical dictionary of key ideas, London: IB Tauris, 16-26.

2004

Cook et al I (2004). Follow the thing: papaya. Antipode, 36(4), 642-664. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Cloke P, Crang P, Philo C, Goodwin M, Painter J (2004). Practising human geography. London, Sage.
Cook IJ (2004). Trade. In Harrison S, Pile S, Thrift N (Eds.) Patterned ground: ecologies of culture and nature, London: Reaktion, 124-126.
Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (2004). Tropics of consumption: getting with the fetish of ‘exotic’ fruit?. In Reimer S, Hughes A (Eds.) Geographies of commodity chains, London: Routledge, 173-192.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2004). ‘The world on a plate: culinary culture, displacement & geographical knowledges’. In Thrift N, Whatmore S (Eds.) Cultural geography: critical concepts in the social sciences (volume 1), Routledge.

2003

Cook IJ, Harrison M (2003). ‘Cross over food: re-materialising postcolonial geographies’. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 28(3), 296-331. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Crang P (2003). ‘The world on a plate: culinary culture, displacement & geographical knowledges’. In Clarke D, Doel M, Housiaux K (Eds.) The consumption reader, London: Routledge, 113-116.

2002

Cook et al I (2002). Commodities: the DNA of capitalism.  Abstract.  Author URL.

2001

Cook IJ (2001). Review of L. Grossman (1998) 'The political ecology of bananas'. Professional Geographer, 53(1), 137-138.
Cook et al I (2001). Social sculpture and connective aesthetics: Shelley Sacks’s ‘Exchange values’. Ecumene, 7(3), 337-343. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Angus T, Evans J (2001). ‘A manifesto for cyborg pedagogy’. International research in geographical & environmental education, 10(2), 195-201. Full text.
Cook IJ (2001). ‘You want to be careful you don’t end up like Ian. He’s all over the place’: autobiography in/of an expanded field. In Moss P (Ed) Placing autobiography in geography, Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 99-120.

2000

Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (2000). 'Have you got the customer's permission?' Category management and circuits of knowledge in the UK food business. In Bryson J, Daniels P, Henry N, Pollard J (Eds.) Knowledge, space, economy, London: Routledge, 242-260.
Cook IJ (2000). 'Nothing can ever be a case of us and them again': exploring the politics of difference through border pedagogy & student journal writing. Journal of geography in higher education, 24(1), 13-27. Abstract.
Cook IJ, Naylor S, Ryan J, Crouch D (2000). Cultural turns / geographical turns: perspectives on cultural geography. Harlow, Longman.
Cook IJ (2000). Culture and political economy: introduction. In Cook IJ, Crouch D, Naylor S, Ryan J (Eds.) Cultural turns / geographical turns: perspectives on cultural geography, London: Pearson.
Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (2000). Regions to be cheerful? Culinary authenticity & its geographies. In Cook I, Crouch D, Naylor S, Ryan J (Eds.) Cultural turns / geographical turns: perspectives on cultural geography, Harlow: Longman, 109-139.

1999

Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (1999). Eating into Britishness: multicultural imaginaries and the identity politics of food. In Roseneil S, Seymour J (Eds.) Practising identities: power & resistance, Oxford: Macmillan, 223-248.
Cook IJ (1999). New fruits and vanity: symbolic production in the global food economy. In Bryson J, Henry N, Keeble D, Martin R (Eds.) The economic geography reader: producing & consuming global capitalism, Chichester: Wiley, 301-306.
Cook IJ (1999). Review of D. Goodman & M. Watts (eds) (1997) Globalising food. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 24(4), 515-516.
Cook IJ (1999). Review of J. Walvin (1997) 'Fruits of Empire: exotic produce and British taste, 1660-1800'. Journal of Historical Geography, 25(2), 250-251.

1998

Cook IJ, Crang P, Thorpe M (1998). Biographies & geographies: consumer understandings of the origins of foods. British food journal, 100(3), 162-167. Abstract.
Cook IJ (1998). Review of J. Allen & C. Hamnett (eds) (1995) 'A shrinking world'. Area, 30(1), 95-96.
Cook IJ (1998). Review of P. Camporesi (1994) 'The anatomy of the senses'. Journal of Historical Geography, 24(1), 104-105.

1997

Cook IJ (1997). Participant observation. In Flowerdew R, Martin D (Eds.) Methods in human geography: a guide for students doing research projects, Harlow: Longman, 127-149.

1996

Cook IJ, Crang P (1996). 'The world on a plate': culinary culture, displacement and geographical knowledges. Journal of material culture, 1(2), 131-153. Abstract.  Author URL.

1995

Cook IJ (1995). Constructing the exotic: the case of tropical fruit. In Allen J, Massey D (Eds.) Geographical worlds, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 137-149.
Cook IJ, Crang M (1995). Doing ethnographies. Norwich, Geobooks. Author URL.

1994

Cook IJ (1994). New fruits and vanity: symbolic production in the global food economy. In Bonanno A, Busch L, Friedland WH, Gouveia L, Mingione E (Eds.) From Columbus to ConAgra: the globalisation of agriculture and food, Lawrence, KA: University Press of Kansas, 232-248.

Refresh publications

External Engagment and Impact

Awards/Honorary fellowships

Visiting Professor in Geography, Université Paris Diderot (2016-17)


Committee/panel activities

Member, Fashion Revolution  Global Coordination Team (2016-)

Fashion Revolution Global Education & Resources Lead (2014-2016)

Member of the Geography Education Research Collective (2013-)

Trustee of the Geographical Association (2011-2016)

​Academic Advisory Board member, Students & Scholars against Corporate Misbehaviour (2008-)


Editorial responsibilities

Geography Compass (Oxford: Blackwell: cultural geography editor, 2006-2012)

Cultural Geographies (London: Sage - editorial board member, 2011-)

Geography (Sheffield: Geographical Association - editorial board member, 2008-)

ACME: an on-line journal for critical geographies (editorial board member, 2000-2007)

Qualitative research (London: Sage - editorial board member, 1999-)


External Examiner Positions

MA in Food Security and Food Justice, University of Sheffield (2015-2018)

University Preparatory Certificate in the Humanities (Geography), UCL (2008-2011)


Invited lectures & workshops

Ian Cook et al (2018) Follow the things: who makes the things we buy, where, how and under what conditions? Invited presentation at the emlyon Lifestyle Research Centre's 'Sustainability Research Day', Lyon.  

Ian Cook et al (2018) Lives in+of food. Invited presentation at the Food 2.0 Lab's 'Rethinking Food + Food Safety' conference, Paris.

Ian Cook et al (2018) Minifiurative politics. Invited talk and LEGOLab at the 'Lives in Brick: Bodies, Justice, Power' workshop, London. 

Ian Cook et al (2018) Minifigurative politics. Inaugural lecture, University of Exeter.

Ian Cook et al (2017) ‘Who made my clothes? MOOCing crowd research on everyday consumption’. Invited presentation at the Geographies of Fashion and Style symposium, University of Bristol, UK; at the Researching the Everyday: Insights from Consumption Studies seminar, Newcastle University, UK; and in the Teddy Talks series, Phoenix Centre, Exeter

Ian Cook et al (2017) Invited panel contriution to ESRC Consumption Ethics: Interdisciplinary Meanings and Intersections seminar, Birkbeck, Univeristy of London, UK.

Ian Cook et al (2017) Why I refuse to write about followthethings.com, and then do so. Invited panel contribution to the RGS(IBG) Digital Geographies Working Group event Revolution, Evolution, Imposition, London, UK

Ian Cook et al (2017) Making sense of (un)ethical trade with LEGO. Invited Lecture+ at the Geographical Association annaul conference, Guildford, UK

Ian Cook et al (2016) Primark on the Rack: making and sharing Political LEGO. Invited seminar, Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Wales

Ian Cook et al (2016) Toxic materialities. Invited organisation of screening and panel discussion of Sasha Friedlander's (2012) documentary Where Heaven Meets Hell for Passengerfilms, London. 

Ian Cook et al (2015) Critical making with web2.0: on the material geographies in/of followthethings.com. Invited seminar in the ‘How social sciences shape society’ conference series, University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Ian Cook et al (2015) Making conversations about ethical consumption with followthethings.com. Invited presentation at the ESRC Consumption Ethics in Society seminar, University of Leicester, UK.

Ian Cook et al (2015) Food talk: geographies of food and the ‘follow the thing approach. Invited keynote at the White Rose DTC Inaugural Food Studies Seminar Event, University of Sheffield, UK.

Ian Cook, Will Kelleher, Charlotte Brunton & Jennifer Hart (2014) followthethings.com: research & teaching through global connection. Invited presentation at the Brown International Advanced Research Institutes, Brown University, Providence RI, USA.

Ian Cook et al (2014) Sparking conversations about research. Invited presentation, GW4 Communication for Collaboration residential, University of Bristol, UK.

Ian Cook et al (2014) Material cultural geography & followthethings.com. Invited presentation to ‘A World Adrift’ studio, Architectural Association School of Architecture, London, UK.

Ian Cook et al (2013) Thinking geographically with followthethings.com. Invited keynote to the ‘Changing Habits for Good’ teacher workshop, Krakow, Poland

Ian Cook et al (2013) Lives in things. Invited opening lecture for the ‘Consumption & Commodities’ lecture series, Bath Spa University, UK.

Ian Cook et al (2013) followthethings.com as open access publishing. Invited panel contribution on ‘Open Access Publishing: a stock-take and critical debate’, RGS(IBG) annual conference, London, UK.

Ian Cook et al (2012) followthethings.com: thinking through materials. Invited keynote at the 'Materialities, Visualities, Securities' workshop, School of Global Studies, University of Sussex, UK.

Ian Cook et al (2011) Writing collaboration. Invited contribution to a panel on ‘Writing creatively: process, practice and product’, Association of American, Geographers, Seattle, USA.

Ian Cook et al (2010) Shopping online: new sites and technologies for 'follow the thing' research. Invited keynote presentation to the ERC EUROQUAL workshop on Spatial and network analysis in qualitative research, European University Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.


Media Coverage

Sirpa Tani (2018) Tarinoita papaijasta, etnografiasta ja tieteen rajojen koettelusta: haastattelussa Ian Cook ja Eeva Kemppainen. Terra 130(1), 39-42

Joss Hands (2015) The Museum of Contemporary Commodities. Digicult October

Anon (2015) The Museum of Contemporary Commodities. Hack Circus (Issue 8, Prediction) September

Lizzie Lloyd (2015) Review of Bideford Black: The Next Generation, Burton Art Gallery and Museum, Devon. Aesthetica 2 November

Olivia Edward (2013) I‘m a geographer: Ian Cook. Geographical magazine April, p.82

Anon (2012) Food Globalisation (interview). Geography in the news, Royal Geographical Society, October


Research networks

Advisory Board member: Blood BricksESRC-DFID funded project (PI Prof Katherine Brickell, Royal Holloway, University of London).

Advisory Board member: Designing a Sensibility for Sustainable ClothingAHRC-funded project (PI Prof Clare Saunders, University of Exeter).


Significant Impact

‘Follow The Things’: developing critical pedagogies to promote geographically-informed and ethically-aware consumption in school geography curriculum (REF 2014 impact case study: download).

Fashion ethics after the Rana Plaza factory collapse (University of Exeter Grand Challenge, Exeter Guildhall shopping centre, 2-6 June 2014: website)

Teaching

Undergraduate modules:

  • GEO1315A: Research Methods for Geographers (BA fieldtrip coordinator)
  • GEO2133: Global lives: multicultural geographies (contributor)
  • GEO2325: Research Methods for Human Geography (contributor)
  • GEO3123: Geographies of Material Culture (co-ordinator)
  • GEOM130: Geographies of Culture, Creativity and Practice (contributor)
  • GEOM132: Space, Politics and Power (contributor)

Free online courses:

  • Who made my clothes? (co-ordinator in association with Fashion Revolution, June-July 2017 & again in June-July 2018)

Teaching awards:

Ian was shortlisted for the University of Exeter Student Guild's 'Innovative Teaching' award in 2010, 2011 and 2012. In 2012, he won the award. 

In 2017, the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) awarded Ian the Taylor and Francis Award for Excellence in the Promotion and Practice of Teaching and Learning of Geography in Higher Education. 

Modules

2018/19


Supervision / Group

Postdoctoral researchers

  • Tara Woodyer (2011-12) Playing with toys: the animated geographies of children's material culture (ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship, Mentor)

Postgraduate researchers

  • Paula Crutchlow (2014-) The Museum of Contemporary Commodities (ESRC-funded PhD, co-supervised with Sam Kinsley)
  • Lizzie Hobson (2017-) Identity, Belonging and Inclusivity in the Cultural Economy (Exeter Funded PhD, co-supervised with John Wylie)
  • Matt Wilkins (2009-) Collaborative publics: shopping, performance and the blind individual (Exeter funded PhD, co-supervised with Paul Cloke) .

Alumni

  • Angeliki Balayannis (2015-18) Following the Pesticides in Disposal: a Chemical Geography (Australian Postgraduate Award-funded, co-supervised with Rachel Hughes and Jon Barnett (Melbourne) and Gail Davies (Exeter))
  • Martin Buttle (2001-05) Ethical finance in the social economy: a multi-locale ethnography (Birmingham University funded PhD, co-supervised with John Bryson)
  • Matt Grace (2009-13) Geography, cancer and dragon boats: ethnographic explorations of breast cancer dragon boating in the Lake District, UK. (Exeter funded PhD, co-supervised with David Harvey)
  • Helen Griffiths (2005-2010) Engaging students as citizens and consumers in new school geographies (University of Birmingham then Exeter, cosupervised with James Evans).
  • Suzanne Hocknell (2012-17) Adding Fat to the Fire: Fat-assemblages and (re)making the world (ESRC-funded PhD, co-supervised with Steve Hinchliffe)
  • Verity Jones (1999-00) A Pear Shaped Thesis: research becoming in/of/with/ the National Botanic Garden of Wales (University funded MPhil, University of Wales, Lampeter)
  • Rebecca Morris (2005-2010) Bloody geographies: exploring identities, relatedness, connectedness and care in the exchange of blood and blood products (University of Birmingham, co-supervised with Jason Chilvers)
  • Rebecca Sandover (2009-13) Doing food - knowing food: an exploration of allotment practices and the production of knowledge through visceral engagement (Exeter University funded PhD, co-supervised with Henry Buller)
  • Lynne Wyness (2008-12) Placing Global School Partnerships: the politics, praxis and pedagogies of global citizenship. (Exeter University funded PhD, co-supervised with Nicola Thomas)

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