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Dr Jen Bagelman

Dr Jen Bagelman

Lecturer in Human Geography

 4404

 Amory D438

 

Amory Building, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ , UK

 Office hours:

Monday 1-2

Tuesday 11-12

Overview

I grew up on Coast Salish territories (Vancouver Island, Canada) where I completed my BA and MA at the University of Victoria. After finishing my PhD at the Open University, I lectured in geography at Durham University and then completed a two-year SSHRC funded postdoctoral fellowship at the University of British Columbia, Canada. I am now a lecturer in human geography.

Broad research specialisms:

  • Migration, asylum and sanctuary
  • Feminist urban studies 
  • Anticolonial environmental justice 
  • Participatory and creative reserach methods (ie: cookbooks, picturebooks, zines)

 

Links

Research group links

Research

Research interests

My academic and activist work critically examines how displacement is produced through exclusionary citizenship and bordering practices. I am also deeply interested in how people mobilize to enact more loving geopolitics. I explore these questions through two main strands of research.

The first strand of my research explores how sanctuary movements challenge (and sometimes inadvertently reproduce) the hostile treatment of refugees and other displaced peoples. My recently published book, Sanctuary City: A Suspended State, explores this topic. Expanding on this work, I am currently leading a GCRF-supported project entitled 'Birthing at the Borders' which explores how women with precarious status living in Kenya's refugee camp of Hagadera mobilize 'sanctuary' to establish alternative networks of maternal care. 

The second strand of my research explores the impacts of colonial displacement on Indigenous peoples, particularly in the Pacific Northwest of Canada. Specifically, I have worked in solidarity with Indigenous communities examining the impact of displacement on traditional food systems. More recently I have explored the impacts of proposed energy development projects on Indigenous coastal communities and how people are resisting through embodied acts such as paddling. I have published this work in an article entitled ‘Geopolitics of Paddling: ‘Turning the Tide’ on extraction’ in a recent issue of Citizenship Studies. I am also working with a team of researchers (Robina Thomas, Glen Coulthard, Philippe Le Billon, Sarah Wiebe, Charles Menzies and Peter Keller) on a five-year SSHRC grant called ‘SEASCAPE: Indigenous Storytelling Studio’ to explore how storytelling and digital tools can be used to affectively counter-map the impacts of energy developments.

Research Groups & External Responsibilities:

I am a member of the Department’s Space Politics and Society reserach group as well as the Cultural and Historical Geographies research group.

Beyond the university, I am a Board Member of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration. With my sister, Carly, I also run a non-profit organization called Glean, which seeks to nourish more equitable foodscapes.

Publications

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications


Cook IJ, Bagelman J (2019). Enacting public geographies. In Kobayashi A (Ed) International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Elsevier.
Bagelman J (2019). Sanctuary. In  (Ed) The Oxford Handbook of Migration Crises.
Simpson M, Bagelman J (2018). Decolonizing Urban Political Ecologies: the Production of Nature in Settler Colonial Cities. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 108(2), 558-568. Abstract.
Bagelman J (2017). Cookbooks: a tool for engaged research. Geohumanities, 1-25.
Bagelman J, Weibe S (2017). Intimacies of Global Toxins: Exposure and resistance in 'Chemical Valley'. Political Geography, 61
Bagelman J, Bagelman C (2016). ZINES: Crafting change and repurposing the neoliberal university. ACME, 15(2), 365-392. Abstract.

Publications by category


Books

Bagelman J (2015). Sanctuary City., Palgrave Macmillan.

Journal articles

Simpson M, Bagelman J (2018). Decolonizing Urban Political Ecologies: the Production of Nature in Settler Colonial Cities. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 108(2), 558-568. Abstract.
Bagelman J (2018). Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move. The AAG Review of Books, 6(3), 169-170.
Bagelman J (2018). Who hosts a politics of welcome? – Commentary to gill. Fennia, 196(1), 108-110. Abstract.  Full text.
Bagelman J (2017). Cookbooks: a tool for engaged research. Geohumanities, 1-25.
Bagelman J, Weibe S (2017). Intimacies of Global Toxins: Exposure and resistance in 'Chemical Valley'. Political Geography, 61
Tedesco D, Bagelman J (2017). The “Missing” Politics of Whiteness and Rightful Presence in the Settler Colonial City. Millennium, 45 Full text.
Bagelman J (2016). Geo-politics of paddling: ‘Turning the Tide’ on extraction. Citizenship Studies, 20(8), 1012-1037. Abstract.
Bagelman J, Bagelman C (2016). ZINES: Crafting change and repurposing the neoliberal university. ACME, 15(2), 365-392. Abstract.
Bagelman J (2015). Blurring the Pipeline: Energizing an account of the Urban. International Political Sociology, 9(1), 101-105.
Bagelman J, Tedesco D (2015). Introduction. International Political Sociology, 9(1), 90-91.
Bagelman J (2013). Sanctuary: a politics of ease?. Alternatives, 38(1), 49-62. Abstract.
Bagelman J, Vermilyea J (2012). The Blind-spots of Kantian Hospitality. Borderlands e-Journal : New Spaces in the Humanities, 11, 1-15.

Chapters

Cook IJ, Bagelman J (2019). Enacting public geographies. In Kobayashi A (Ed) International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Elsevier.
Bagelman J (2019). Sanctuary. In  (Ed) The Oxford Handbook of Migration Crises.
Squire V, Bagelman J (2012). Taking not waiting: Space, temporality and politics in the city of sanctuary movement. In  (Ed) Citizenship, Migrant Activism and the Politics of Movement, 146-164.
Bagelman J (2011). Canadian Multiculturalism: Paradoxical Discourses of Symbolic Exclusion. In Nohl A, Schmidtke O (Eds.) Cultural Capital in Migration, Verlag, 235-246.

Internet publications

Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Border enforcement & the university: a conversation. Society & Space, Walking Out, 1-5. Full text.
Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Home Office rules mean non-British academics can be denied right to strike.  Author URL. Web link.
Squire V, O’Donoghue B, Bhogal I, Closs Stephens A, Jalloh U, Ntung A, Del Sarto G, Yuval-Davis D, Bagelman J (2017). Dead Reckoning / Crossing the Med: Thinking and Feeling Migration Differently.  Abstract. Web link.
Bagelman J (2016). 'Wristband IDs mark refugees as less than human.' Ricochet. Web link.
Bagelman J (2016). Foucault & the “Current” Refugee Crisis.’ Open Democracy. Web link.
Bagelman J, Wiebe S (2014). 'Preventing a Pipeline from Bisecting Canada.' New York Times. Web link.

Publications by year


2019

Cook IJ, Bagelman J (2019). Enacting public geographies. In Kobayashi A (Ed) International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Elsevier.
Bagelman J (2019). Sanctuary. In  (Ed) The Oxford Handbook of Migration Crises.

2018

Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Border enforcement & the university: a conversation. Society & Space, Walking Out, 1-5. Full text.
Simpson M, Bagelman J (2018). Decolonizing Urban Political Ecologies: the Production of Nature in Settler Colonial Cities. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 108(2), 558-568. Abstract.
Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Home Office rules mean non-British academics can be denied right to strike.  Author URL. Web link.
Bagelman J (2018). Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move. The AAG Review of Books, 6(3), 169-170.
Bagelman J (2018). Who hosts a politics of welcome? – Commentary to gill. Fennia, 196(1), 108-110. Abstract.  Full text.

2017

Bagelman J (2017). Cookbooks: a tool for engaged research. Geohumanities, 1-25.
Squire V, O’Donoghue B, Bhogal I, Closs Stephens A, Jalloh U, Ntung A, Del Sarto G, Yuval-Davis D, Bagelman J (2017). Dead Reckoning / Crossing the Med: Thinking and Feeling Migration Differently.  Abstract. Web link.
Bagelman J, Weibe S (2017). Intimacies of Global Toxins: Exposure and resistance in 'Chemical Valley'. Political Geography, 61
Tedesco D, Bagelman J (2017). The “Missing” Politics of Whiteness and Rightful Presence in the Settler Colonial City. Millennium, 45 Full text.

2016

Bagelman J (2016). 'Wristband IDs mark refugees as less than human.' Ricochet. Web link.
Bagelman J (2016). Foucault & the “Current” Refugee Crisis.’ Open Democracy. Web link.
Bagelman J (2016). Geo-politics of paddling: ‘Turning the Tide’ on extraction. Citizenship Studies, 20(8), 1012-1037. Abstract.
Bagelman J, Bagelman C (2016). ZINES: Crafting change and repurposing the neoliberal university. ACME, 15(2), 365-392. Abstract.

2015

Bagelman J, Wiebe S (2015). 'Reflecting on Public Philosophy with Jim Tully’.
Wiebe S, Monk D, O'Connor C, Bagelman J (2015). 'Turning the Tide: a People’s Paddle for the Salish Sea'.  Abstract.
Bagelman J (2015). Blurring the Pipeline: Energizing an account of the Urban. International Political Sociology, 9(1), 101-105.
Bagelman J, Tedesco D (2015). Introduction. International Political Sociology, 9(1), 90-91.
Bagelman J (2015). Sanctuary City., Palgrave Macmillan.

2014

Bagelman J, Wiebe S (2014). 'Preventing a Pipeline from Bisecting Canada.' New York Times. Web link.

2013

Bagelman J (2013). Sanctuary: a politics of ease?. Alternatives, 38(1), 49-62. Abstract.

2012

Squire V, Bagelman J (2012). Taking not waiting: Space, temporality and politics in the city of sanctuary movement. In  (Ed) Citizenship, Migrant Activism and the Politics of Movement, 146-164.
Bagelman J, Vermilyea J (2012). The Blind-spots of Kantian Hospitality. Borderlands e-Journal : New Spaces in the Humanities, 11, 1-15.

2011

Bagelman J (2011). Canadian Multiculturalism: Paradoxical Discourses of Symbolic Exclusion. In Nohl A, Schmidtke O (Eds.) Cultural Capital in Migration, Verlag, 235-246.

Refresh publications

Teaching

I am passionate about working with students as I see education as a powerful catalyst for generative change. I have written on creative pedagogy and, in keeping with a ‘service-led’ teaching model I aim to make coursework relevant to and useful for communities that extend beyond the classroom. In the past my students have created beautiful community maps that have been used by NGOS and urban designers and zines that have informed campus policies to embed diversity and ensure more sustainable food practices.

I warmly welcome the opportunity to work with students interested in the themes outlined on my research page.

Modules

2018/19


Supervision / Group

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