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Dr Jonathan Cinnamon

Dr Jonathan Cinnamon

Lecturer in Human Geography

 5318

 Amory C254

 

Amory Building, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ , UK

Overview

Jonathan Cinnamon is a lecturer in human geography. Broadly trained in the discipline, Jonathan is interested in health geographies, GIS, cities, data, and technology. He completed a BA with honours at Ryerson University in Toronto in 2007. In 2009 he received a MA from Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, and in 2013 completed his PhD, also at SFU. Prior to starting his current position at Exeter in 2014, he was a visiting scholar at Ohio State University, funded by a postdoctoral award from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. He was also a visiting scholar at Wits University in Johannesburg in 2017, funded by a fellowship from the South African National Research Foundation and UK Newton Fund.

Broad research specialisms:

  • geographic information science
  • critical GIS
  • critical data studies
  • digital geographies
  • health geographies 

Office Hours:

Term 3

Weds 12:30-13:30 and Thursday 12:30-13:30

 

 

Qualifications

BA (Ryerson University)
MA (Simon Fraser University)
PhD (Simon Fraser University)

Research

Research interests

Jonathan’s two main intellectual fields are human geography and geographic information science, which are seeing an increasing convergence and cross-pollination of theory and practice, notably through recent developments in visual methods and digital geographies. His interests are informed by and contribute to a range of theoretical and empirical domains, from social models of health and science and technology studies (STS), to critical GIS and participatory geographies. Methodologically, his empirical work uses GIS and spatial methods, as well as qualitative approaches.

Within geographic information science and the emerging area of digital geographies, Jonathan is interested in developments around user-friendly mapping and analysis platforms produced by and for the public.  Also, he is interested in the emerging landscape of data production and analytics in which heterogenous actors including governments, corporations, citizens, and community groups now produce and use digital data in diverse ways. His interest in this area lies in thinking about the opportunities these new sources of data might conceive for understanding the world, especially in 'data poor' settings, but also the potential for widening digital inequalities in the age of digital technology and big data. More generally, this research is conceptually underpinned by an interest in the complex and dynamic sociotechnical relations that exist between geospatial technologies and people.

Within human geography, his work has broadly focused on social vulnerabilities in urban environments. His research seeks to understand how processes of social vulnerability are mediated and shaped by urban environments. Focusing in particular on health-related vulnerabilities, a common topic throughout his research career is a focus on injury risk and community safety, one of the world’s most significant and challenging health issues. The aim of this programme of research is to enable low-resource settings and community groups to understand local injury and safety contexts. In his PhD project he developed geospatial Web mapping and crowdsourcing platforms for a hospital in Cape Town and he collaborated with a community organization on a research project about pedestrian safety, which resulted in policy change related to safety infrastructure and traffic calming in Vancouver. Due to the success of this collaboration, he has formed an interest in exploring the ways that geographic data and knowledges are produced and the circumstances by which they are legitimized and circulated in society.

Recent Projects and Funding:

2016-17:  Do Nightlights Emissions Enlighten? Exploring the Effect of Local Economic Conditions on Violence Against Civilians During Civil War. UK Economic and Social Research Council/Arts and Humanities Research Council. £62,000, Co-Investigator (with Nils-Christian Bormann and Stacey Hynd). 

  • In this interdisciplinary mixed-methods project we are exploring the link between economic development and civil conflict in Uganda. In the absence of economic data in this setting, we are using a novel high spatial resolution satellite dataset consisting of night light emissions to develop a proxy model of economic activity, which  will be followed up by qualitative research to gather in depth perspectives on the development–conflict relationship in this setting. The expected outcomes of the project are twofold. First, the project will provide valuable knowledge about this relationship in a country significantly affected by civil conflict historically and in the present. Secondly, a core aim of the project is to validate the methodological approach, which could then be applied to understand the relationship between economic development and a variety of social issues at micro scales.
  • Project website: http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/do-nightlights-emissions-enlighten/

2016-17: Building Digital Identities: A Scoping Study. University of Exeter ESRC Impact Acceleration Fund. £3,000, Co-Investigator (with Ana Beduschi and Chunbo Luo). 

  • This project is exploring how digital personal location and behavioural data might be used in the production of personal identification documents. This project responds to target 16.9 of the Sustainable Development Goals, which aims to provide legal identity to all by 2030. Legal identity is something that millions worldwide go without, which limits citizenship rights amongst other challenges. This initial scoping project will map out the potential for digital identification systems to be constructed with new forms of personal data produced through daily transactions, interactions, and movements.
  • Project website: https://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/law/research/projects/project/?id=566

2015: A Framework For Using Mobile Phone Data For Disease Disaster Response. UK Economic and Social Research Council and Department for International Development. £2,500, Principal Investigator (with Co-Investigators Neil Adger and Sarah Jones). 

  • This scoping project developed an initial framework to guide researchers and humanitarian organizations in the ethical, responsible and practical uses of data produced through mobile phones, including call detail records (CDRs) and data produced actively through two-way SMS communications. Focusing specifically on their use during disease-related emergencies and outbreaks, the results of this study identified the potential value in CDR data for understanding and managing population movements during infectious disease outbreaks, and how SMS based crowdsourcing could rapidly produce time sensitive data on resource needs and patient cases, and could be used for patient monitoring and triage. 
  • The article published from this project was published in Geoforum, and was the recipient of the Elsevier Atlas Award for articles with the potential for significant social impact: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016718516301981

2014-2015: Assessment of Access to Trauma Center Care in Ohio Using Geographic Information Systems. Ohio Department of Public Safety. $50,000. Co-Investigator (with Daniel Sui and Huiyun Xiang). 

Publications

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications


Cinnamon J (2017). Social injustice in surveillance capitalism. Surveillance and Society, 15(5), 609-625. Abstract.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Jones SK, Adger WN (2016). Evidence and future potential of mobile phone data for disease disaster management. Geoforum, 75, 253-264. Full text.
Thatcher J, Bergmann L, Ricker B, Rose-Redwood R, O Sullivan D, Barnes TJ, Barnesmoore LR, Beltz Imaoka L, Burns R, Cinnamon J, et al (2016). Revisiting critical GIS. Environment and Planning A, 48(5), 815-824. Full text.
Cinnamon J (2015). Deconstructing the binaries of spatial data production: Towards hybridity. The Canadian Geographer, 59, 35-51. Abstract.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Schuurman N (2013). Confronting the data-divide in a time of spatial turns and volunteered geographic information. GeoJournal, 78(4), 657-674. Abstract.
Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Matzopoulos R, Fawcett V, Nicol A, Hameed SM (2011). Collecting injury surveillance data in low- and middle-income countries: the Cape Town Trauma Registry pilot. Global Public Health, 6(8), 874-889. Abstract.  Author URL.

Publications by category


Journal articles

Cinnamon J (2017). Social injustice in surveillance capitalism. Surveillance and Society, 15(5), 609-625. Abstract.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Jones SK, Adger WN (2016). Evidence and future potential of mobile phone data for disease disaster management. Geoforum, 75, 253-264. Full text.
Thatcher J, Bergmann L, Ricker B, Rose-Redwood R, O Sullivan D, Barnes TJ, Barnesmoore LR, Beltz Imaoka L, Burns R, Cinnamon J, et al (2016). Revisiting critical GIS. Environment and Planning A, 48(5), 815-824. Full text.
Cinnamon J (2015). Deconstructing the binaries of spatial data production: Towards hybridity. The Canadian Geographer, 59, 35-51. Abstract.  Full text.
Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Walker BB, Fawcett V, Nicol A, Matzopoulos R (2015). Intentional injury and violence in Cape Town, South Africa: an epidemiological analysis of trauma admissions data. Global Health Action, 8(1). Abstract.  Full text.
Zargaran E, Schuurman N, Nicol AJ, Matzopoulos R, Cinnamon J, Taulu T, Ricker B, Garbutt Brown DR, Navsaria P, Hameed SM, et al (2014). The electronic Trauma Health Record: design and usability of a novel tablet-based tool for trauma care and injury surveillance in low resource settings. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 218(1), 41-50. Abstract.  Author URL.
Giesbrecht M, Cinnamon J, Fritz C, Johnston R (2014). Themes in geographies of health and health care research: Reflections from the 2012 Canadian Association of Geographers annual meeting. Canadian Geographer, 58(2), 160-167. Abstract.
Nicol A, Knowlton LM, Schuurman N, Matzopoulos R, Zargaran E, Cinnamon J, Fawcett V, Taulu T, Hameed SM (2014). Trauma Surveillance in Cape Town, South Africa: an Analysis of 9236 Consecutive Trauma Center Admissions. JAMA Surgery Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Schuurman N (2013). Confronting the data-divide in a time of spatial turns and volunteered geographic information. GeoJournal, 78(4), 657-674. Abstract.
Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Matzopoulos R, Fawcett V, Nicol A, Hameed SM (2011). Collecting injury surveillance data in low- and middle-income countries: the Cape Town Trauma Registry pilot. Global Public Health, 6(8), 874-889. Abstract.  Author URL.
Cinnamon J, Schuurman N, Hameed SM (2011). Pedestrian injury and human behaviour: observing road-rule violations at high-incident intersections. PLoS One, 6(6). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Frank R, Dabbaghian V, Reid A, Singh S, Cinnamon J, Brantingham P (2011). Power of criminal attractors: Modeling the pull of activity nodes. JASSS, 14(1). Abstract.  Full text.
Crooks VA, Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Castleden H, Johnston R (2011). Refining a location analysis model using a mixed methods approach: Community readiness as a key factor in siting rural palliative care services. Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 5(1), 77-95. Abstract.
Cinnamon J, Schuurman N (2010). Injury surveillance in low-resource settings using Geospatial and Social Web technologies. International Journal of Health Geographics, 9 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Schuurman N, Crooks VA (2009). Assessing the suitability of host communities for secondary palliative care hubs: a location analysis model. Health and Place, 15(3), 792-800. Abstract.  Author URL.
Cinnamon J, Rinner C, Cusimano MD, Marshall S, Bakele T, Hernandez T, Glazier RH, Chipman ML (2009). Evaluating web-based static, animated and interactive maps for injury prevention. Geospatial Health, 4(1), 3-16. Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Rinner C, Cusimano MD, Marshall S, Bekele T, Hern├índez T, Glazier RH, Chipman ML (2009). Online Map Design for Public-Health Decision Makers. Cartographica, 44, 289-300.
Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Crooks VA, Hameed SM (2009). Pedestrian injury and the built environment: an environmental scan of hotspots. BMC Public Health, 9 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Schuurman N, Crooks VA (2008). A method to determine spatial access to specialized palliative care services using GIS. BMC Health Services Research, 8 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

Chapters

Cinnamon J, Ronquillo C (2018). mHealth Geographies: Mobile Technologies and Health in the Global South. In Crooks V, Andrews GJ, Pearce J (Eds.) Routledge Handbook of Health Geography.  Full text.
Sui D, Cinnamon J (2017). Volunteered geographic information. In Richardson D, Castree N, Goodchild MF, Kobayashi A, Liu W, Marston RA (Eds.) The International Encyclopedia of Geography: People, the Earth, Environment, and Technology, Wiley and the American Association of Geographers. Abstract.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Sui DZ (2016). Spaces and Places: Engaging a Mixed-Methods Approach for Exploring the Multiple Geographies of Pedestrian Injury. In Giesbrecht M, Crooks VA (Eds.) Place, Health and Diversity: Learning from the Canadian Experience, Ashgate, 96-118.  Full text.

Reports

Beduschi A, Cinnamon J, Langford J, Luo C, Owen D (2017). Building Digital Identities: the Challenges, Risks and Opportunities of Collecting Behavioural Attributes for new Digital Identity Systems. University of Exeter and Coelition.  39 pages.  Abstract.  Full text.

Internet publications

Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Border enforcement & the university: a conversation. Society & Space, Walking Out, 1-5. Full text.
Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Home Office rules mean non-British academics can be denied right to strike.  Author URL. Web link.

Publications by year


2018

Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Border enforcement & the university: a conversation. Society & Space, Walking Out, 1-5. Full text.
Bagelman J, Cinnamon J (2018). Home Office rules mean non-British academics can be denied right to strike.  Author URL. Web link.
Cinnamon J, Ronquillo C (2018). mHealth Geographies: Mobile Technologies and Health in the Global South. In Crooks V, Andrews GJ, Pearce J (Eds.) Routledge Handbook of Health Geography.  Full text.

2017

Beduschi A, Cinnamon J, Langford J, Luo C, Owen D (2017). Building Digital Identities: the Challenges, Risks and Opportunities of Collecting Behavioural Attributes for new Digital Identity Systems. University of Exeter and Coelition.  39 pages.  Abstract.  Full text.
Cinnamon J (2017). Social injustice in surveillance capitalism. Surveillance and Society, 15(5), 609-625. Abstract.  Full text.
Sui D, Cinnamon J (2017). Volunteered geographic information. In Richardson D, Castree N, Goodchild MF, Kobayashi A, Liu W, Marston RA (Eds.) The International Encyclopedia of Geography: People, the Earth, Environment, and Technology, Wiley and the American Association of Geographers. Abstract.  Full text.

2016

Cinnamon J, Jones SK, Adger WN (2016). Evidence and future potential of mobile phone data for disease disaster management. Geoforum, 75, 253-264. Full text.
Thatcher J, Bergmann L, Ricker B, Rose-Redwood R, O Sullivan D, Barnes TJ, Barnesmoore LR, Beltz Imaoka L, Burns R, Cinnamon J, et al (2016). Revisiting critical GIS. Environment and Planning A, 48(5), 815-824. Full text.
Cinnamon J, Sui DZ (2016). Spaces and Places: Engaging a Mixed-Methods Approach for Exploring the Multiple Geographies of Pedestrian Injury. In Giesbrecht M, Crooks VA (Eds.) Place, Health and Diversity: Learning from the Canadian Experience, Ashgate, 96-118.  Full text.

2015

Cinnamon J (2015). Deconstructing the binaries of spatial data production: Towards hybridity. The Canadian Geographer, 59, 35-51. Abstract.  Full text.
Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Walker BB, Fawcett V, Nicol A, Matzopoulos R (2015). Intentional injury and violence in Cape Town, South Africa: an epidemiological analysis of trauma admissions data. Global Health Action, 8(1). Abstract.  Full text.
Cinnamon J (2015). Review of: the data revolution: big data, open data, data infrastructures and their consequences. ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING B-PLANNING & DESIGN, 42(3), 566-567. Author URL.

2014

Zargaran E, Schuurman N, Nicol AJ, Matzopoulos R, Cinnamon J, Taulu T, Ricker B, Garbutt Brown DR, Navsaria P, Hameed SM, et al (2014). The electronic Trauma Health Record: design and usability of a novel tablet-based tool for trauma care and injury surveillance in low resource settings. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 218(1), 41-50. Abstract.  Author URL.
Giesbrecht M, Cinnamon J, Fritz C, Johnston R (2014). Themes in geographies of health and health care research: Reflections from the 2012 Canadian Association of Geographers annual meeting. Canadian Geographer, 58(2), 160-167. Abstract.
Nicol A, Knowlton LM, Schuurman N, Matzopoulos R, Zargaran E, Cinnamon J, Fawcett V, Taulu T, Hameed SM (2014). Trauma Surveillance in Cape Town, South Africa: an Analysis of 9236 Consecutive Trauma Center Admissions. JAMA Surgery Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

2013

Cinnamon J, Schuurman N (2013). Confronting the data-divide in a time of spatial turns and volunteered geographic information. GeoJournal, 78(4), 657-674. Abstract.

2011

Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Matzopoulos R, Fawcett V, Nicol A, Hameed SM (2011). Collecting injury surveillance data in low- and middle-income countries: the Cape Town Trauma Registry pilot. Global Public Health, 6(8), 874-889. Abstract.  Author URL.
Cinnamon J, Schuurman N, Hameed SM (2011). Pedestrian injury and human behaviour: observing road-rule violations at high-incident intersections. PLoS One, 6(6). Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Frank R, Dabbaghian V, Reid A, Singh S, Cinnamon J, Brantingham P (2011). Power of criminal attractors: Modeling the pull of activity nodes. JASSS, 14(1). Abstract.  Full text.
Crooks VA, Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Castleden H, Johnston R (2011). Refining a location analysis model using a mixed methods approach: Community readiness as a key factor in siting rural palliative care services. Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 5(1), 77-95. Abstract.

2010

Cinnamon J, Schuurman N (2010). Injury surveillance in low-resource settings using Geospatial and Social Web technologies. International Journal of Health Geographics, 9 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

2009

Cinnamon J, Schuurman N, Crooks VA (2009). Assessing the suitability of host communities for secondary palliative care hubs: a location analysis model. Health and Place, 15(3), 792-800. Abstract.  Author URL.
Cinnamon J, Rinner C, Cusimano MD, Marshall S, Bakele T, Hernandez T, Glazier RH, Chipman ML (2009). Evaluating web-based static, animated and interactive maps for injury prevention. Geospatial Health, 4(1), 3-16. Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.
Cinnamon J, Rinner C, Cusimano MD, Marshall S, Bekele T, Hern├índez T, Glazier RH, Chipman ML (2009). Online Map Design for Public-Health Decision Makers. Cartographica, 44, 289-300.
Schuurman N, Cinnamon J, Crooks VA, Hameed SM (2009). Pedestrian injury and the built environment: an environmental scan of hotspots. BMC Public Health, 9 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

2008

Cinnamon J, Schuurman N, Crooks VA (2008). A method to determine spatial access to specialized palliative care services using GIS. BMC Health Services Research, 8 Abstract.  Author URL.  Full text.

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Refresh publications

External Engagement and Impact

Awards

2016: Winner of the Atlas Award for the articleEvidence and future potential of mobile phone data for disease disaster management”, published in Geoforum with co-authors Sarah Jones and Neil Adger. Each month a single article is selected from published research from across Elsevier’s 1,800 journals by an external advisory board. The award honours published research with potentially significant social impact.


Membership of Research Council committees

2015-19: Member of the Peer Review College. UK Economic and Social Research Council


Significant Impact

2009-2011: I have been involved in a research project and community-based collaboration that informed pedestrian safety initiatives and traffic calming in Vancouver, see: http://vancouver.ca/people-programs/pedestrian-safety-in-the-dtes.aspx, and media coverage of the research: The Georgia Straight. “Vancouver Traffic puts Pedestrians at Risk” www.straight.com/news/vancouver-traffic-puts-pedestrians-risk.

Teaching

Undergraduate:

  • GEO3138: Geographies of Health 
  • GEO1106: Geographies of Global Change (global health section)
  • GEO1315: Research Methods for Geographers (GIS and mapping section)
  • GEO2308: Human Geography Field Trips 
  • GEO2325: Research Methods in Human Geography (GIS and mapping section)

Postgraduate:

  • GEOM131: Geographies of Life
  • GEOM132: Space, Politics, and Power

Modules

2018/19


Supervision / Group

Postgraduate researchers

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